Want to work as a recruiter? Read this…

February 28th, 2011

One of my users asked about a job as a tech recruiter so I pointed him over to a buddy of mine who is a … tech recruiter.  My friend’s response was VERY interesting. I remember, in my job search, thinking that being a recruiter might be a fun and interesting job.

Consider this (slightly edited, and emphasis is mine):

Do you want to work for an agency? If so, I think __________ is hiring. _________ has a reputation for having an excellent training program as well. _________ and others are reasonable as well. _________ is one of the “boutique” agencies in the market right now and does top-notch work. Finally, you may want to talk with _______ at _______, a very good, high end tech shop. I can introduce you, if you wish.

Watch out for non-compete agreements, if you go with an agency. They are fairly standard, but be sure if you leave a company, you can still make a living… 6 month waiting period or 50 mile distance from your “home” recruiting area is what you should go for. 1yr max. More than that, and I would seriously think that company knows they will burn you out and not make you successful. Also, make sure their comp structure rewards you for performance and doesn’t cap out on you.

Good luck. It’s a crazy world out there.

Great advice… the lesson I learned from this is to ask for advice from people who are in the field you think you want to go into!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

“Friday Might Be My Last Day Here”

February 24th, 2011

Recently I was talking to a working professional. Someone who is happy in her job, contributing to the organization, indeed, living the dream.

This person is in a significant role, and if she left her organization would be in pain.

As we were talking, she said something I don’t hear enough, but I love to hear it (this is paraphrased):

“This Friday, or any Friday, could be my last day here.  What am I doing to prepare for that?”

Too often I talk with employed (even self-employed) people who are happy in their role and are neglecting personal career management.

From personal experience I can tell you that ignoring the elephant in the room, and ignoring the “writing on the wall,” is a very, very, very bad career management strategy.

Even if you are very busy at work, even if you are the most important person at the office (every one is replaceable, even YOU), even if things at the company seem to be going great, even if you just got a big bonus, even if you have a great relationship with the boss or owner, even if _____________…

YOU MUST MANAGE YOUR CAREER!

You must ask yourself: “what am I doing for that Friday?”

That Friday will come.  It might be on a Monday, or over the weekend, but it will come.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How to REALLY Help a Job Seeker

February 23rd, 2011

One question I hated while in a job search was:

How’s your job search going?

The answer I said was “it’s going okay,” but what I thought was “it sucks more than you could imagine!”

When I speak I share a brilliant response to the question, but in this post I want to share an idea I had for people who ASK the question.  Feel free to forward this on to… well, the entire world, because EVERYONE should think about this.

Perhaps this normal question is the best way to start out the conversation, and 99% of job seekers respond as I have below, but then see how the conversation changes after their lame response (yes, they know it is lame, but there is a reason they respond that way).

Job Seeker Friend: How’s your job search going?

Job Seeker: Fine.

Job Seeker Friend: <awkward pause>

Job Seeker: <awkward pause>

Job Seeker Friend: What companies are you trying to get into?

Job Seeker: Oh, um, I’ve been applying at Company A, Company B and Company C.  There are others, but those are the three I’m most interested in.

Job Seeker Friend: I might know someone at one of those companies… let me see if I can find their information for you.

Job Seeker: That would be great – can you send an email introducing us to one another?  I find an introduction is much better than me calling out of the blue.

Job Seeker Friend: That’s a great idea, I’ll do it as soon as I find their information.

Job Seeker: Thank you!

Job Seeker Friend: What titles are you interviewing for?

Job Seeker: I’m looking for a role as a ____ or an _____.

Job Seeker Friend: You know, I think I know someone who has been a ___ for a while.  I can introduce you to her, also.

Job Seeker: I really appreciate the leads!  I will be sure to follow up with them, and I’ll let you know how it goes.

Job Seeker Friend: Great.  You’ll see a few emails soon.

Job Seeker: Thank you!

See how this works?  There are a few things going on here.  Here’s the dialog again, with my comments in black:

Job Seeker Friend: How’s your job search going?

Job Seeker: Fine. We all hate this question… but if you end here you miss an opportunity!

Job Seeker Friend: <awkward pause> this is where it usually ends, right?

Job Seeker: <awkward pause>

Job Seeker Friend: What companies are you trying to get into? This question is GOLD.  Coach your friends to ask you this question.

Job Seeker: Oh, um, I’ve been applying at Company A, Company B and Company C.  There are others, but those are the three I’m most interested in. You should be able to list three target companies at all times.  You can change them as often as you wish, but you need to be able to rattle them off.

Job Seeker Friend: I might know someone at one of those companies… let me see if I can find their information for you.

Job Seeker: That would be great – can you send an email introducing us to one another?  I find an introduction is much better than me calling out of the blue. This is SO true… an email intro is worth 100 times what you get from an email address or phone number.

Job Seeker Friend: That’s a great idea, I’ll do it as soon as I find their information.

Job Seeker: Thank you!

Job Seeker Friend: What titles are you interviewing for? Another golden question!

Job Seeker: I’m looking for a role as a ____ or an _____.

Job Seeker Friend: You know, I think I know someone who has been a ___ for a while.  I can introduce you to her, also.

Job Seeker: I really appreciate the leads!  I will be sure to follow up with them, and I’ll let you know how it goes. This is so critical.  If you give an intro, let the person know that you actually acted on it – they are more likely to do more introductions later.

Job Seeker Friend: Great.  You’ll see a few emails soon.

Job Seeker: Thank you!

It is our job, as job seekers, to help people who want to help us. If someone asks “how’s your job search going,” don’t blow it. Instead, help them understand how they can help you – give them a little work to do. They’ll appreciate it!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Is The Economy Getting Better? Notes From an MBA Econ Class

February 22nd, 2011

In a comment on my job search depression post, “Blissful” shared some very interesting thoughts from her MBA level econ class regarding the economy:

>> What I learned in my Economics class is quite disturbing. The economy is actually not getting better.

Any surprises here?

>> When you hear on the news that unemployment rate decreased, well it’s not because people are getting jobs it’s because people become so discouraged that they dropped out of the labor force and stopped looking for work so the #unemployed/labor force = a lower percentage.

I’ve been saying this a lot – glad to hear the econ profs are talking about it frankly!  Newspapers and politicians have to know this but they always seem to paint a rosy, misleading picture. It’s practically right out of Atlas Shrugged :s

>> When you think that the stocks market improved and you’re getting more returns on your investment; well that’s not really the case here.

Oh crap. I haven’t read much on this… explanation from Blissful below…

>> The Federal Reseve purposely devalued the dollar so we appear cheap to the foreigners to invest in us. When there is a high demand for dollars, the price for investing in dollars will go up. That is the law of supply and demand in economics. So now, all of a sudden it looks like your ROI is getting so much better.

Yuck.  This is not a good path.  It is not sustainable.

>> The government is trying to make you think that you’re wealthier so that you can go out and start spending again.

I’m afraid of “so we can go out and start spending again,” considering so many people spent money they didn’t have (aka, loans).

>> That will put more money into the circulation of the economy.

True, but if people aren’t responsible for the money they spend (in other words, they don’t have it, or it’s a loan, etc., than pumping junk money into an economy will only result in more bankruptcy, foreclosures, etc.).  If this is what the government is doing it’s very, very flawed.

>> But what they don’t understand is that we’re NOT going to spend more money if we don’t have JOBS!!!!!!!!!

Spoken like a true unemployed person :)  Jobs is what we need.  Unfortunately, fake jobs is not what we need.  Government spending to create jobs is not what we need because it’s not sustainable, and it’s not the role of government.  We need policies in place that help business thrive.  When businesses thrive, they hire, and spend, and feed the economy.

Scary times?  Yes, indeed.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Email Signature Critique: Julianne Franke

February 21st, 2011

Julianne is a student in my new Certified LinkedIn Career Strategist program (which I hear is awesome, by the way :p).  In our last session we talked about email signatures and I asked if I could share a critique of her signature with you – she agreed :)  Here is her old signature, with my thoughts:

  1. I think it’s funny when people have an email signature with their name, but they put their name again.  It just looks a little funny.  I’ve had to get used to having my signature and not putting my name twice on each email.
  2. This is alphabet soup for job seekers, really. When I was in a job search I didn’t know what any of those certifications meant, and they weren’t significant to me.  I have a bias, though… in IT, a few years back, IT certifications were somewhat meaningless.  I think it immediately distracts from what your marketing/branding message is by adding stuff that doesn’t make sense to your target audience (perhaps put this down lower?).
  3. The two lines under her name are good – they give me information about her and what she does.  Too often this is jargon, and people might not understand what it really means. I’ve started to tell job seekers they should try and say “I help people/companies _____ by ______.” with NO jargon or cliche.
  4. I don’t know what a NOW WHAT facilitator is or does — even putting “connecting you with your purpose” doesn’t help me get it.  Can you say this in simple English, so I can immediately get it?
  5. Telephone, skype, email, websites, LI and FB profiles are all good and perhaps appropriate.  My only concern is that this is a very long email signature, and I think the longer it is, the less likely it will be read in it’s entirety… which means people might miss your branding message.
  6. Fax?  If you take anything off, I’d take this off, since it probably is important to less than .5% of the people you email. And if it is important you can simply email it to them, without cluttering up your branding message.
  7. This was a gotcha…!  Many people would put @juliannefranke, but you didn’t. I would suggest people who ARE on Twitter would be fine with an @, and not to put Twitter: ____.  People who ARE NOT on Twitter will likely not know what to do with this handle.  It also isn’t a hyperlink – either put @____ or put the entire URL (so it becomes a hyperlink).

Overall I think it is a good email signature, but go back to these points and you can see some opportunity to really tighten it up :)

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Favorite Friday: I Just Got Fired

February 18th, 2011

This was hands-down one of my favorite little projects: A powerpoint that shared part of my/our story:

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

NEW: JibberJobber Mobile Interface #awesome!

February 17th, 2011

Recently we launched the new mobile interface for JibberJobber.  You can get to it at m.JibberJobber.com.

JibberJobber is your private relationship management database.  We originally designed it to help people organize a job search but quickly realized many people would use it to manage their professional relationships.  We also found entrepreneurs and business people would use it as a CRM (customer relationship manager).

This is our first attempt at the mobile interface.  From here we can go in a few different directions, but we needed to get this out so we could get lots of feedback.  Is it awesome? Is it missing something?  What can we do to make this more powerful so when you are on-the-go you can easily do what you need to in JibberJobber?

Here were our two main criteria when we designed this:

  1. FAST (Part I)! If you go to normal site on a mobile (which you can) it is slower to load since it is SO busy, especially for a small screen.  We wanted this to be fast and easy for you to get to and use, which means we stripped out a lot of stuff, and made the views optimized for a small screen (see screenshots below).
  2. FAST (Part II)! We tried to identify the handful of critical things you might want to do from a mobile device…. when you are on the road you might want to look someone up, or add a new contact, or add a new log entry, etc.

We listed these features and only included what was on our list.  I’m sure we missed some.  As we hear back from YOU we’ll enhance the mobile interface, OR, for now, you can go to the normal site, to get what we’ve missed.

All improvements will be based on user feedback, so tell us what you think at the Contact Us form!

Here are some screenshots:

Login page: simple, simple, simple!

Home page: simple navigation to get to the main functions you might use on the go.

Add a Contact: Simple, simple, simple!

Add a Log Entry: Simple, simple, simple!

View record: Powerful!  When I view a record the phone numbers are clickable, so I can dial right from that page.  I’ve used this a lot while I’m on the road!

Is this cool or what?  It is definitely about time!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

What is a Personal Relationship Manager?

February 16th, 2011
NEW! Check out the new JibberJobber mobile interface: m.JibberJobber.com.

A few years ago someone emailed me and said they were looking for personal relationship manager software, and they didn’t find JibberJobber, even though they should have.

What is Personal Relationship Manager software?

The phrase comes from “customer relationship manager,” which is software salespeople use to organize their customers and prospects.

It is their database, allowing them to enter names and numbers, notes about conversations and important facts (like birthdays, so they can send you a card), even things like what religion you are, where you went to school, etc.

A salesperson who is working on a relationship wants to log as much relevant information as possible so the next time they communicate with you, which might be in two years (!), they can pick up where they left off.

Knowing this stuff might seem creepy, but it’s important to let the other person know they are important to you, and keeping the information somewhere helps you in your communications to the prospect.

Fast forward to today, where many non-sales professionals are realizing there is no job security, and we need to manage our own careers as if it were a business (aka, Me, Inc.).

We need a software system to help us keep all of OUR prospects, customers and network contacts organized.

For some, that simply means keeping names and numbers and email addresses in a central location.

For others, they want more, like the ability to associate a contact to one of their target companies.

Whether you need a lot of functionality, or just a little functionality, using a database to track all of this information can be quite beneficial as you transition through multiple jobs in a career.

This is what people call a Personal Relationship Manager.

And that is exactly what JibberJobber is.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How to Pick a Brain (Sheila Scarborough)

February 15th, 2011
NEW! Check out the new JibberJobber mobile interface: m.JibberJobber.com.

A few weeks ago I wrote a contraversial post titled Should You Have To Pay To Have Lunch With ME?

My friend Dawn Bugni sent me a link to a slideshare presentation by Sheila Scarborough about picking a brain, titled No, You May NOT Pick My Brain.

Enjoy!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Gen Y Whiners, Baby Boomers Out Of Touch: The Problem with Stereotyping

February 14th, 2011
NEW! Check out the new JibberJobber mobile interface: m.JibberJobber.com.

Friday I shared a Favorite Friday about Gen Y acting like a bunch of whiners.  It was a good post, and the comments were amazing.

There is a major problem with any stereotyping (generational, color, religion, etc.).

The problem is that IT IS WRONG to stereotype.

By stereotyping we assign certain character traits, or characteristics, to people, simply based on certain criteria.

Like the really tall guy who is always asked “do you play basketball?” … just because he’s tall.

Or the ____ ethnic group who is assumed to be really, really good at math.

Or the geeky looking (emphasis on the “looking”) person who, of course, can fix your computer.

Or the ______ who _______.

The sad thing is that we automatically assigning things which are likely false to a someone based on something (color, etc.).

We all know this is bad.

But we all do it.  You do it. I do it. We all do it.  When we do it innocently we don’t think much of it.  But when we are on the other end of the table, getting discriminated against, it’s outrageous, isn’t it?

This reality sucks.

This reality also presents a real “opportunity.”  We, individually, have to break through these unfair stereotypes and define who we are.

When we send a resume, or go to a networking event, or are in an interview, we might be wrogfully stereotyped.

Our opportunity is to break through the stereotype, and let the right, true characteristics scream out louder than the stereotyped characteristics.

Can you do that?

Can anyone do it?

Yes, indeed, we can.

I think I know how, but I’ll ask you: how do you make your own defining characteristics stand out more than the stereotyped characteristics?

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

« Previous Entries



what
job title, keywords
where
city, state, zip
jobs by job search



Learn more...
Buy now