Fearless Salary Negotiation: Josh Doody and Kristen Jacoway Beasley

June 29th, 2016

Here’s the latest in a new podcast series from my friend Kristen Jacoway Beasley:

fearless_salary_negotiation

At that page you can listen to the podcast, or read the transcript.

Here’s one nuggest I picked out… there are tons more in this content-rich interview:

Kristen asks: “what kinds of things would you recommend people research before they go into an interview so that they’ll know how to show their value add?”

Josh replies: “That’s a great question, and I think you hit the nail on the head, that that research before the interview is really how you begin that process of telling that story by demonstrating, you know, first and foremost that…” Read the whole thing here.

Here is the page with Kristen’s other podcast episodes. Enjoy!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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JibberJobber Mobile Apps: Android and iOS (Apple)

June 21st, 2016

Liz asked me to let you know the mobile apps are available. I thought I did but I can see that I didn’t make a proper announcement… so…

THE JIBBERJOBBER MOBILE APPS ARE AVAILABLE!!!

Check out the JibberJobber mobile app page here.

JibberJobber for Android is here.

JibberJobber for iOS is here.

Please rate and review them, if you are in a good mood. If you are in a grumpy mood, well… be kind :p

What’s the plan with these mobile apps?  Just like we have updated and maintained the JibberJobber web tool for years and years, we’ll update and maintain the mobile apps.

The first update of the mobile apps is coming soon, based on lots of feedback from users.

Cost: free

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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LinkedIn Summary vs. LinkedIn Experience Sections

March 29th, 2016

I got this question from Derek, who saw my LinkedIn Optimization course on Pluralsight (which you can get access to for free… read below):

“I just completed the course on LinkedIn Profile Optimization and feel that I have a strong above the fold profile which the video was mainly focused on.

The video didn’t focus on the experience section and what to write based off what you did at the company. You touched on writing mini stories for the summary and experience sections, I am not sure writing only mini stories will give the best overall picture in the experience section. Do you have another video on pluralsight that helps enhance the content for the experience section?”

This is a great question. After doing group trainings and one-on-one consultations for years, I feel like my “best answer” is jelling pretty good. Of course, there are exceptions, but in 99% of the one-on-one consultations I do, and the Profile critiques I’ve done, the answer below will be appropriate.

It’s critical to think about the LinkedIn Profile as one single marketing document.  If you break up the sections of the Profile, and think about them as a critical reader (recruiter, hiring manager, prospective funder, partner, prospect, customer, etc.) might, you could probably guess that some parts are more important than others.  For example, your Professional Headline is not only at the top, but it’s a part of your “mini profile,” and seen in other places on LinkedIn (other than your Profile page). On the other hand, the best way to contact me, or the seeking sections, are largely ignored (by design, because they are so far down the Profile).

If we think about the Profile as a single marketing document, the question is, what is the single message of the document?  I am now counseling my consultation customers to have that single message communicated in a concise and clean way in the Professional Headline.  This is what I call your “main claim,” or your primary claim.  Then, your Summary has five to seven secondary claims, ALL OF THEM SUPPORTING THE MAIN CLAIM.  These can be communicated in various ways, my favorite of which is the mini-stories.

You can see all of this in action in my LinkedIn Profile Optimization course on Pluralsight for free.  How?  JibberJobber users get a free 30 day pass to Pluralsight, which means you can watch this, and dozens of my other courses (including the LinkedIn Proactive Strategies course), during your 30 day window.  Click here to see how you can have access within a 60 seconds – no credit card required.

Okay, so in the Pluralsight course, it’s clear how to position the secondary claims and make your Summary much better than the status quo.  Derek gets that, but wonders what to do in the Experience section, which some people call the job description – the parts in each of the jobs you list in your Profile. This really isn’t a job description, although some people treat it that way. I suggest you make this more about YOU and less about the job.

How do you do that?

I think the best way is to use the exact same strategy as what you used in the Summary section. That is, secondary claims (that all support the primary claim in the Professional Headline), with mini-stories that (a) present the claim, (b) give a “for example,” and (c) quantify the results.

Mini-stories are SO powerful. When you align them with your primary claim, you give further evidence and support that your primary claim is valid, and that you are focused and understand your value.

What I normally see is resume-like statements that are super concise, and super dry and boring. Worse, they look cliche. They look like what anyone else would write that has your same job history, and is making the same claims, and is looking for the same job you are looking for.

Okay, you think, maybe that’s not so bad.  To be honest with you, having resume-speak on your Profile is better than the weak, non-information that I see on too many Profiles. So kudos for having anything that helps me understand you more.

But what I’d rather see you have in your “experience” sections are mini-stories that each (a) make a claim, (b) give me a meaty for-example, and (c) tell me why it matters (ie, the quantification)… this is what we accomplish with mini-stories, and (d) support the primary claim. This last part is important so the reader doesn’t get sidetracked by irrelevant information.

That’s my recommendation… from the summary all the way down through the Experience section… claims, quantification, and alignment.

Do you have a different idea? Leave a comment and let us know!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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How To Marry Excel and Word for Mass Letters

March 28th, 2016

I did this many, many moons ago. It takes a little bit of work, but not too much. If you want to send mass letters that look customized (based on the name of the recipient), here’s how you do it: How to use Microsoft Excel and Word to send multiple emails.

This post was written in 2009 by Walt Feigenson, a friend in the Silicon Valley area. We met when I was in town a few years back, speaking at some job clubs, and the last time I saw him was at his house for dinner (on a different trip).  The stories he has of the history of software, which he was involved with, are awesome.

And this merge technique, which might feel a little dated, is really quite powerful.  YMMV, based on editions of Word/Excel… if yours doesn’t work the way he describes, figure it out and let me know in the comments what is different :) (that is a tactful way of saying: I’m not tech support for this tactic – good luck :))

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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6 Great Tech Tools for Job Seekers (from Recruiter.com)

March 24th, 2016

Recruiter.com included JibberJobber in their list of great tech tools for job seekers. Check out the paragraph or two on each of these tools at Next-Level Job Search: 6 Great Tech Tools for Job Seekers.

  1. LearnUp. Job skills training, career coaching, automatic interview scheduling for entry-level job seekers.
  2. Jobscan.co. Analyzes job descriptions and your resume to tell you how they stack up. Free for up to 5 matches, about $90/year for more. JibberJobber has some of this functionality (read here), but jobscan is very cool and more comprehensive then our version 1 attempt.
  3. Page Monitor. Tells you when something on a website has changed. Personally, I would suggest you forego checking page changes at this degree and just go out and network.
  4. SnapDat. Allows you to exchange contact info from one iphone to another. I can’t figure out how to find it in the store, though…
  5. Woo.io. Put together a wish list of your ideal job… and then they send you jobs/companies that match.  Very cool concept… I have never heard of them, though.
  6. JibberJobber. For obvious reason, this is a tech tool I can stand behind! :)
what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

JibberJobber Apps: iOS and Android Now Available

March 17th, 2016

Filed in “it’s about time!”, we are finally announcing the version 1 apps for Android and iOS.  That’s right, we now got our coveted app buttons (click either of these, they work):

app_android_download_button

 

app_ios_download_button

Please send us your feedback so we can improve the next few versions. We’ll be working on this the rest of this year (probably the rest of forever) to make these powerful tools for you and your career.

I’d also appreciate any honest ratings in the stores, but if you feel like you should give us a low rating, I’d rather have you not do that and just message us to let us know why, so we can fix it.  Otherwise, people look at low ratings and think “THEY SUCK!” while it’s just stuff we need to improve on.  If you tell us, we’ll work on it.

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

JibberJobber iPhone iOS Native App: Waiting for Review

March 10th, 2016

jibberjobber_native_app_iosThis morning we submitted the app to the Apple store.  The image on the right is the confirmation that they got it, and some human (hopefully) will review it.

We launched the android app a couple of weeks ago… it was a very different process to get that on Google Play.

When this goes live we’ll let you know.  Pretty awesome and yes,  it is about time :)

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

JibberJobber Email2Log Tip Sheet

March 8th, 2016

This is a list of tips and tricks to use Email2Log to it’s full capacity.

Setup

Under Logs, click on Email2Log. There are 3 fields:

  1. Keyword: this is to create your unique, private Email2Log email address that others generally won’t see.  Your keyword provides a bit of security so that others can’t guess your Email2Log email address, or use it. Do not put a password or anything private here.  My keyword is simply “log”.
  2. From Emails: These are the emails that are authorized to use your Email2Log email address. Put in any email that you would use, as well as any emails from people using JibberJobber with you (spouse, admin, etc.). I have the three emails that I have used over the years, as well as the email address of my admin.  If an Email2Log is received with the right address, from any of those 4 senders, then JibberJobber will accept and process the email.
  3. Log End Line: This is a string of characters that tells the server to ignore anything below it. For example, mine is “~!~!~!~!~” … in an email I send to Email2Log, everything above that line is put into the Log Entry. Everything below it is ignored.  That way you don’t create Log Entries that are too long. I recommend you create a Log End Line with a string that people won’t normally put into regular emails. Notice, people would likely not freehand type what I put in, since it’s hard to do, but they might regularly put in something like —— or _______ (so, those would be bad Log End Lines).

OOPS!

What if you forget to put your ultra-secretive Email2Log email address in the BCC when you send an email to someone?  There are really three options:

  1. Copy the email and paste it into a Log Entry in JibberJobber.  This is what people on the free account do, and it works fine, but it’s much faster and easier to do either of the next two options.
  2. Reply to your email, sending to the same people, and add more information… so you are sending a second email with a “Oh yeah, I forgot to mention….”  When you do this, you’ll put the entire email thread into one Log Entry (remember to remove the Log End Line). This will make sense sometimes.
  3. Forward the email to the JibberJobber server. Instead of putting the Email2Log email in the BCC field, just put it in the TO: field, and send ONLY to the server.  You’ll need to make sure you change a bit of the body, so that the server knows what to do with it (see special lines, Contact:____ line).  I do this 99% of the time.

Special Lines

There are special lines, anywhere in the body of an email, that mean something specific to the Email2Log logic… These would each go on their own line.

[LogEndLine]

For me, this is “~!~!~!~!~”… yours might be different, depending on how you set it up. This truncates the email and only puts what’s above the Log End Line into the Log Entry. See above, in Setup, #3 for more info.

startdate:[date]

This is used to create a due date for an action item. If I put startdate:+1 week in an email, on it’s own line, then the email will become a Log Entry, with a due date, or Action Item, one week from when I sent it. That example is a “relative” start date, or one week from today. You can also do “absolute” start dates, like startdate:4/1/2016 or startdate: April 1, 2016.

contacts:[contact_info]

Typically I put an email address in, like Jason@JibberJobber.com. The system will look for any Contact records with that email address and put the email into a Log Entry under that/those records.

You can put in multiple contacts, separated by commas.

If that email is not in one of your Contacts, it will create a new Contact (you can merge later, if it’s a duplicate). If I know I’m sending to someone who does not have a Contact record in JibberJobber, I will do something like this: “Jason Alba” <Jason@JibberJobber.com> and that will create a new Contact record with the first name, last name, and email address.

NOTE: from the OOPS! section above… if I am forwarding an email to the server, because I forgot to put the Email2Log email address in the BCC when I sent the email, I will go into the body of the email and find the line that shows the TO information (name, email), and simply edit that line so it now looks like this: contacts:“Jason Alba” <jason@jibberjobber.com>

companies:[company name]

Works the same as contacts… if the exact company name is the name of a Company record, it will find it and put the Log Entry under that record. If not, it will create a new Company record.

You can put in multiple company names, separated by commas.

jobs:[job_title]

Works the same as contacts… if the exact company name is the name of a Company record, it will find it and put the Log Entry under that record. If not, it will create a new Company record.

You can put in multiple job titles, separated by commas.

In the Getting Started video series, you can see all of this in action in videos #4 and #5.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

JibberJobber Mobile App for Android

February 26th, 2016

Yesterday I announced the JibberJobber app for android is available in the Google Play store.  You can check it out here: JibberJobber Android App. The iOS app should be out soon…

Here’s a screenshot of the homepage, with my annotations in red.

JibberJobber_android_app_v1

1. The back button is on every page, which you’ll use to navigate back to where you came from.

2. The dropdown menu… for now, similar to the bottom menu (#6)

3. On the home screen, you see your action items due today.

4. The main menu…

5. If you click “Contacts,” or “Companies,” etc. you’ll go to a page to see and search for your Contacts, Companies, etc.  On the right, if you click the + button, you can add new records.

6. The main menu.. home, Contacts, Companies, Jobs, and Action Items.

This is Phase I… there’s more to come.  We need your feedback on any problems you come up against, anything that is not intuitive, and as important, any features you want to see included in the next releases.

Thanks!

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

New: The JibberJobber Mobile App for Android

February 25th, 2016

Yesterday I posted Announcement #1.  This is Announcement #2.

Today we released the Android app for JibberJobber.  If you are a JibberJobber user, please download this free app and let us know what you think.  The iOS app should be released soon, although Apple has a longer release process… so I really don’t know when that will be available.

Click here to see it.

This app is pretty cool.  We’ve worked on the design, development, and testing for months.  It’s also what I call “version 1.” The most important thing we need at this point is YOUR FEEDBACK.

If there is anything that doesn’t work right, or any part of the design that is not intuitive, or if there are features that you need/want, please let us know. Use the Contact page to let us know what we can do to improve (and, what you like).  Your feedback is critical so that we can make Phase II even better.

Here’s a direct link to the app in the Google Play store. Hopefully the app will be found in the store soon, but for now just use that link.

We’d appreciate any great rankings. If you have a problem with anything, please contact us immediately so we can get it fixed… that’s a lot more effective than leaving a rant or low rank on the app store.

Thanks, and we look forward to hearing from you!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

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