Why Recruiters Don’t Call Back

July 14th, 2016

“Network with recruiters,” they said.

I did. About 30 of them. It was an exercise in ME reaching out to THEM and rarely hearing anything back from them.

I didn’t understand the relationship between recruiters and job seekers, nor did I understand the role recruiters play. What is a job seeker to them?  What are their goals?  Understanding those things helped me realize why no one was calling me back.

I just read Lisa Rangel’s 12 Unspoken Reasons Why Recruiters Are Not Calling You Back. She lists 3, and gives you a link to download a paper with the rest.   Anything I’ve read from Lisa is great, and worth the time…. so go check it out.

Here’s my answer to why recruiters don’t call you back: because you are not a likely candidate to fill a role they have been hired to fill.

It’s that simple.

I thought recruiters were “power networkers” (which is  phrase from Keith Ferrazzi’s Never Eat Alone book). Some might be, but many I’ve talked to are not good networkers at all.

I thought recruiters loved to, and were good at, helping people get hired.  Not really… that’s not necessarily their job.  Their job is to fill a role… not help someone (anyone) get hired.  I’ve come to learn that that expectation is as absurd as expecting the butcher at my grocery store to come to my house and cook the meat I bought.  It’s just completely, totally outside of what they get paid to do, and even what they are trained to do.

When I realized that recruiters didn’t call back because they didn’t have a role that was perfect for me, and they never would call back unless I was going to help them fill a role, I moved on. I stopped forcing networking with these supposedly great networking contacts, and networked with other people.

Doing this was mentally liberating. My expectations and hopes, with regard to relationships with recruiters, was more realistic. And I spent time where I needed to.

How about you – are you ready to move on from “networking” with recruiters?

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Fearless Salary Negotiation: Josh Doody and Kristen Jacoway Beasley

June 29th, 2016

Here’s the latest in a new podcast series from my friend Kristen Jacoway Beasley:

fearless_salary_negotiation

At that page you can listen to the podcast, or read the transcript.

Here’s one nuggest I picked out… there are tons more in this content-rich interview:

Kristen asks: “what kinds of things would you recommend people research before they go into an interview so that they’ll know how to show their value add?”

Josh replies: “That’s a great question, and I think you hit the nail on the head, that that research before the interview is really how you begin that process of telling that story by demonstrating, you know, first and foremost that…” Read the whole thing here.

Here is the page with Kristen’s other podcast episodes. Enjoy!

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Want a Shorter Job Search?

June 10th, 2016

I like Susan Joyce. I like her story, her passion, and her mission.  Her website, Job-hunt.org, has helped many people through the years.  She just shared her thoughts in an article on LinkedIn titled 10 Steps to a Shorter Job Search.

susan_joyce_linkedin_article

You know what sucks about any politician celebrating unemployment numbers?  This line from Susan’s first paragraph: “And over two million have been unemployed for one year or more.”

You know who those two million people are?  Regular people. Like you and me. I’ve met them across the U.S.  Very talented people.  People who have a lot to offer.  Many of the long-term unemployed I’ve met are struggling with age discrimination. Some were in their 50’s and 60’s… you kind of expect them to struggle with age discrimination, right?  I met plenty of people in their early 40’s that complained about age discrimination.

Here’s what I want you to do: read her post.  Make a checklist of things to do daily (or, regularly), and one-time things that you need to fix/do/cleanup. Then, make a list of things you would do AFTER you land your next job.  We live in a world of constant career management, and networking and things like that are must-dos, as part of the new normal.

I love everything Susan says… here are some of my comments:

#3: I say do MORE than one a week.  Perhaps five a week?  And have purposeful, strategic conversations.

#4: Yes, do this, but make sure it’s not spending time reading articles and news, etc.  Your time on LinkedIn as a job seeker is a time for strategic networking preparation. Finding who to talk to, who you want introductions to, and learning more about those people, is the reason you are spending time there.

#7: the key to The List is that you work the list, and figure out how to network in, and get new introductions from everyone you can along the way. Making a list isn’t a job search… working the list, with a purpose, is.

#9: that is why I offer JibberJobber users a 30 day pass…!

Susan’s article deserves your time and attention.  If you need to recalibrate, this is the article for you. Jump over now.

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Rookie Job Search Mistakes #BarbaraSafani

May 12th, 2016

Barbara Safani wrote a great article on Forbes that really could have been seven articles: Seven Mistakes For Rookie Job Seekers To Avoid.

Normally when I see a list like this it has some really no-duh, obvious, fluffy things.  But I’ll tell you, having been in this business for ten years now, this list is SPOT ON.  Do not skip over any of the seven things that Barbara writes about… they are all super important to know about and beware of.

barbara_safani_forbes

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Timing, Listening and Talking Over #LessonsFromASpeaker

May 11th, 2016

michael_webb_headshotMany years ago I was speaking at a job club in East Bay (east of San Francisco) and had a delightful time. A new friend (Michael Webb) in the audience gave me invaluable feedback afterwards, which was something like this:

“Jason, you are very funny… and you know you are funny.  Let me give you a tip that I learned while doing improv, to improve my own speaking…”

He went on to tell me that instead of letting the audience laugh at the funny things, I continued to talk, essentially talking over the audience. Instead of letting the energy build, I essentially diffused the potential energy and took away from my ability to impact lives.

His tip? Give the audience time to react.

Recently my wife directed a Shakespeare play with 12 and 13 year old kids. It was fantastic, of course… but one thing I noticed was that these young actors didn’t quite understand how to let the audience relish in the humor. They would say or do something funny, and then as soon as the audience erupted into laughter (or applause), they would say their next line.

The laughter (or applause) brings energy to the whole room, energizing the actors to be better and the audience to be more involved… and they were “crushing it” (not in a good way).

I recently heard about a salesperson who… okay, get ready to cringe… wouldn’t let the prospect talk.  The salesperson always brought the conversation back to himself… his issues, his thoughts, his experiences… YUCK. That tactic is not in any sales training, book, manual, etc.

how does this apply to you?

When you network, you have an “audience.”  When you interview you have an “audience.”  When you are on the phone you have an “audience.”

Are you talking over yourself, or the other person?  Are you allowing time, during the discussion, to make a point?

This powerful tip learned from an improv session, and passed to me by Michael Webb, is a life and communication skill that I’ll continue to work on, and share whenever it’s appropriate.

 

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Work, Vision, and Lots of Stage Time #LessonsFromASpeaker

May 10th, 2016

jason_hewlett_headshotI saw an ad on Facebook from a guy that I am probably destined to know: the speaker/entertainer Jason Hewlett. I say I’m probably destined to know him because (a) we have a mutual friend who talks about him a lot, and (b) I hear he has been active at SLC National Speakers Association chapter meetings, which I used to go to every month (and someday might go back to).

Here’s the first part of his Facebook ad (here’s his video that explains what the ad is about):

“In the past week I have received 5 urgent messages from speakers and entertainers asking how I’ve had such success in this business. The questions are all the same and people are shocked when I reply that it takes work, vision, and lots of stage time.”

This struck me because I’ve been writing about job search for almost 10 years now, and the questions seem to be about the same, and the answers seem to be about the same. I even got to the point, a few years ago, where I wrote “well, there’s nothing else to write about this stuff… it’s all been written.”

Jason’s reply has three parts, and they absolutely applicable to you:

Work: There really is no way around this… work has to be done. Sure, you could get lucky… but what you want (more money, a better job, owning your own gig, selling your own creation, that next promotion, etc.) will most likely require a lot of work. it could be manual labor, it could be deep thinking, it could be working through bureaucracy (aka, playing the game), it could be working on yourself (which is really hard work!) or helping others work on themselves… instead of having “work” be a scary “four letter word,” let’s embrace work, and appreciate the opportunity we have to work. Let’s make the fact that we have to work something that is okay!

Vision: If we don’t have a vision, then what are we working for?  “I want to be a….”, “I want to have….”, “I want to help…” are all statements that will help us know WHY we do what we do. Having a vision is especially helpful when we are faced with a hard task, or troubling times.  Vision strongly correlates with hope… and if we do not have hope, then why in the world do the hard things?  Do not let your vision (or hope) die… you’ll come to rely on it many, many times.

Lots of stage time: So you are a hard worker… and you have a great vision. You are doing great!  Whether you want to be on stage as a professional speaker or not, you need to be in front of your audience. For introverted software developers that might mean participation in online forums… for marketing professionals that might mean a blog on marketing from your perspective, for wannabe executives, that might mean hobnobbing with executives. Whatever “stage time” means to you, let me share two important points: First, Jason says to get LOTS of it. This doesn’t just happen… you have to (a) actively seek it out, and (b) when opportunities come your way, you say YES.  You want LOTS of stage time. Second, YOU WILL FAIL. I have presented hundreds of times, and some of you might know I’ve failed more than once. Once I failed so bad I seriously considered just not speaking anymore.  It was an embarrassing failure. I did take a few weeks off, but I knew that I needed to get back on the (speaking) horse. I did… and later on, I failed again, and again, and … then I found myself failing less frequently. I got BETTER. I learned from my mistakes. But I wouldn’t have learned from my mistakes if I hasn’t made them. Get LOTS of stage time so you can learn to be better.

Thanks for these three suggestions, Jason! This is a great path for an aspiring speaker, and it’s definitely a great path for you and your career!

 

 

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“Outsourcing the job search may feel calm…” #jobsearch

April 27th, 2016

jacqui-barrett-poindexterJacqui Barrett-Poindexter is a friend and career professional. She wrote How to Keep Your Eye on Your Career Destination Prize (blog post).  Here’s a great quote that she put on Facebook, from her blog post:

“Outsourcing the job of job search may feel calm, as you are head-down, performing the assigned tasks. However, this method of career management can derail you–and your career–if not kept in check. You must commandeer your own job search. Strategically enlist people, tools and processes to help arrive at your personally prescribed destination …”

Yes, you can outsource it. But don’t do it blindly.  Don’t stay hands-off.

And when she says “strategically enlist tools,” let me recommend JibberJobber as THE tool to help you organize and manage your job search. :)

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Blog Recommendation: Ask a Manager

April 26th, 2016

If you are looking for an excellent career blog to read, check out Ask a Manager, by Alison Green.  She doesn’t know I’m writing this and probably has no idea who I am.

jibberjobber_ask_a_manager

I love candid, tell-it-like-it-is advice, and this is exactly what you’ll find on Ask a Manager. Lots of scenarios and questions that you will likely relate to.

Here are her favorite posts, and her most favorite post is this: An ode to the bad managers of my past

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How To Network Like a Veteran

March 23rd, 2016

Here’s a great post by Chad Storlie on Every Veteran Hired: 10 Steps to Networking Success: An Easy (and Effective) Strategy

You may not be military-trained, but that shouldn’t stop you from understanding and following the 10 steps. This is more than a cute article with some cute ideas… I strongly urge you to follow each of the steps, in order.

Except, of course, Step 5, which says to use a spreadsheet for your contacts. Obviously you would use JibberJobber.  You can start with a spreadsheet, but as you network more you’ll find the spreadsheet becomes a rats nest of information, and soon it becomes unusable.

Check it out!

 

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JibberJobber: One of the Best Job Search Websites for 2016

January 20th, 2016

jibberjobber-best-job-search-website-logoThis is a list worth being on… JibberJobber has been on many lists over the last 10 years, but some of those lists that say they are “here are the best” are really “here are all of the sites we could find”… being on a list made up by someone who is just trying to list everything out there was not flattering.

This list is different.  Hannah Morgan, The Career Sherpa, put together 43 Best Job Search Websites 2016, and included JibberJobber.  Hannah is a career practitioner, subject matter expert, and a thought leader.  To have her vet and include JibberJobber is meaningful.

Check out the other 42 recommendations:

jibberjobber-best-job-search-website

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JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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