Paul in Minnesota: 22 Levels Deep…!

December 5th, 2014

On this morning’s Focus Friday webinar I was astounded to read a comment from Paul in Minnesota about how many levels of connections he reached before he landed his job.

Some context: on many of my webinars, I’ve repeated one of the greatest things I learned in my own job search, which is that you find your job leads from your third and fourth degree contacts, not from your first and second degree contacts.  This is such a profound concept…. the idea that as we develop relationships with people, we continually ask for introductions.  More often than not, you won’t have your first or second degree contact. Unfortunately, the way LinkedIn works, they mess up how we track this.  But in JibberJobber we can track down to the nth degree.

Anyway, Paul wrote this comment on our webinar today, in response to talking about the free vs. premium levels of JibberJobber (note that we were talking about the email2log feature… which is premium, but the tracking to of referrals is in the free level):

“[The upgrade is] totally worth it.  I would say it’s the best investment for  your job search. I got down to 22 levels of contacts before I landed my position and JibberJobber was the tool that helped me keep track. (No way I could have done this on my own).

I’ve heard this type of gratitude for JibberJobber before… and I love hearing it (especially on a Friday, what a great way to end my work week :) ).  But what floored my was what Paul was doing: 22 Levels?

That is so awesome! That is how an effective job search is done!  Talk to people, ask for referrals, do informational interviews….!

Great job Paul! An inspiration to us all!

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Martin Yate: Build A Career Management Database From Your Social Networking Leads (stay organized)

December 3rd, 2014

martin_yate_headshotI recently read this article posted on LinkedIn by Martin Yate: IS YOUR USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING FOR JOB SEARCH PRODUCTIVE?

In the article, Martin (who you may have heard of before – he has authored a number of best selling career books (in the Knock em Dead series)), has a section titled: Build A Career Management Database From Your Social Networking Leads

I want to share some of what he wrote, and my thoughts:

>> Building a career management database on your desktop now, and nurturing it over the long haul, is a critical component of your long-term survival and financial security.

Yep, that’s what we have been preaching for almost nine years now.  But don’t build it on your “desktop.”  In the last nine years how many PCs have you gone through?  How many files, folders, programs, etc. have you lost by switching from one computer to another?  Instead of building this critical component of your long-term survival and financial security” on your desktop, build your long-term database in JibberJobber.  It’s an absolute no-brainer.  The desktop is not the place to put your critical component (aka, your career management database).

>> In addition to job postings, you should create folders for target companies that gather together all the insights you unearth about that company and your contacts within it when they are not already captured as networking contacts on your social media sites. You should capture the same information about recruitment firms and your contacts within them.

Absolutely.  Most job seekers start their tracking system thinking they need to track information about the jobs they are applying for, and hoping to interview for.  This is important, but I would suggest that it’s more important to track (1) relationships and communication with network contacts, and (2) information you gather about potential target companies.

Again, don’t use “folders.”  Use JibberJobber.

Here’s one point I disagree with… Martin says to track information about “your contacts … when they are not already captured as networking contacts on your social media sites.”

I think that a social network site, like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Xing, etc. is a great place to find contacts, research contacts, gather information… but it IS NOT the place to track information such as when you met them, what conversations you’ve had with them, when you were supposed to follow-up with them, how strong your relationship is, who introduced you to them, who they introduced you to, etc.  These are all things that you aren’t going to do in a social networking tool, but you can do all of them in JibberJobber.

JibberJobber is like a hub for collecting and tracking information that you glean from other sources, whether from various social sites, news articles, job postings (which sometimes have names and email addresses), face to face meetings, etc.  Don’t let the whimsical features of a social platform decided whether you can or cannot track this stuff the right way – use the social tools to collect information, and then go to JibberJobber to record everything you want to track.

>> Additions to your professional knowledge base should be made at the time they accrue. For example, when you establish contact with recruiters who work in your industry, save all details about the person and the company in a document, and store the document within the appropriate folder at the end of your day. If you don’t capture the information for retrieval as you gather it, you’ll remember it for a couple of days, but you’ll have long forgotten everything when next you need it a year or two down the road.

That is absolutely right.  Don’t worry if you haven’t been tracking this information… or if in the future you forget to track something here or there.  You aren’t going to track 100% of everything you come across.  Don’t beat yourself up if you miss stuff.  But the more you track, the more valuable your tracking tool (aka, JibberJobber) becomes to you.

>> Organize yourself to capture information today that you can use throughout your work life and you create an important foundation for your future security.

Absolutely.  This is why you should use JibberJobber.  Remember, JibberJobber is not a job search band-aid… that is, you scrap it when you land your next gig. JibberJobber is a long term career management tool that will be with you during your twelve to fifteen transitions!

 Martin says: “…statistics predict between twelve and fifteen job and career changes throughout your work life. Carefully storing and organizing the professionally relevant intelligence you capture during this job search will supply your next transition with a starting point far superior to anything you have at your fingertips today.

Organizing.  Far Superior.  Good stuff.  If you aren’t serious about using JibberJobber yet, this article should be the little nudge you’ve needed.

 

 

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JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Thank YOU!

November 27th, 2014

In the U.S. we celebrate Thanksgiving.  It’s a time when families and friends get together, gratitude is shared, and food is consumed.

I want to share my gratitude for YOU today.  Almost nine years ago I was kicked in the teeth, aka laid off.  I went through a pitiful, depressing job search.  I went from the top of the world to the bottom of the barrel.

Then one day, I got the idea for what would eventually become JibberJobber.  It was risky and scary, but it gave me a purpose and hope.  It changed my demeanor, my attitude and my outlook.

Since 2006 we’ve helped a few people in their job search.  We’ve been recommended by coaches and career experts.  I’ve spoken across the U.S. (and in Turkey, which makes me an “international speaker”). JibberJobber has been recommended or endorsed by big news and tiny bloggers.

Here we are, almost nine years later, still making progress, still helping a few people.  And we appreciate every single one of you.

Recently, I was chatting with my developer about an issue a user was having.  I said that this user was important to me (“a big deal”), and he said:

“Oh dude… C’mon… They are ALL a big deal to you…”

I loved that.  In fact, you are a big deal to me.  No matter how new or old you are, whether you are on the free or the upgrade side, you are all a big deal to me. You are all a big deal to all of us at JibberJobber.

I was delighted that my developer, without any prompting, replied that way.  This is the culture that I have always wanted to create in my company.  It’s about people.  Customers (you), my team, etc.

People matter. You matter. And I’m grateful for you.  Now, I’m off to eat some turkey :)

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Is “What Do You Do?” a Question That Haunts You?

November 26th, 2014

thom_allen_headshot_linkedinThom Allen was one of the earliest friends I met when I moved to Utah.  I’ve networked with Thom over the years and we’ve consistently had a funny conversation: “Thom, explain to me again exactly what you do?”

This blog post was inspired by Thom’s 2009 blog post: A Question That Haunts Me Wherever I Go

Thom would always tell me something cool.. but the more I learned about Thom, the contracts he had, his professional passions, the less I understood about him.  I guarantee that some of you, reading this blog post, have the same issues communicating your personal brand.  Let’s take Thom’s blog post and talk about some of it:

Speaking of the first person Thom met at a particular networking event, he says: “In the software development world, Alistair is the rock star God of the agile methodology.”  I love that Thom writes it that way.  He makes it clear that Alistair doesn’t have a branding problem, unless of course Alistair doesn’t want to be known as the “rock star God of the agile method” in the entire software dev world.  That’s a powerful statement and observation, and something that some of us want to shoot for: a very high level of clarity and accuracy of how others talk about us.

Thom writes, “At the end [of my conversation with Alistair], he started to ask me what I did. First sign the night was going to be rocky.

Uh-oh.  If you are going to a networking event, and you aren’t prepared to answer the most common question you’ll hear, multiple times, during that meeting, you got a problem.  It’s definitely going to be rocky.

Thom says that he shook hands with various guests, “many who I knew,” and Thom writes “Most asked me again, what I did. I wondered where these people had been. Why don’t they remember?

Does this sound familiar to you?  I hear this frequently. It’s why I wrote the post Why Tell Your Network What You Do When They Already Know What You Do?

Thom continues with his networking story, and says he was surprised that he was introduced to a small group of networkers as he was “connected to everyone.”  He writes “it feels unnatural when someone says that about me.” He later asked that same friend “why do I have such a hard time getting people to remember what I do? The friend’s response was awesome:

“Because no one really knows what you do! Most people think you do everything, but no one knows what you do. You’re always vague.”

Thom talks about having an elevator pitch, which is something that he says he told others to do, but he hadn’t taken his own advice.

Look, I think most elevator pitches stink.  When I present, I say 99.999% of elevator pitches I hear stink.  BUT, not having a pitch allows others to misinterpret who you are.  Why didn’t Thom do that?  The same reason many of us don’t. He writes:

“I guess my failure to successfully convey what I do stems from years of not wanting to be defined by my work. So I kept it vague. But as a business owner I can’t do that anymore. I need to clearly define what I do. There’s no way I can network without being able to convey what I do. It’s not the part I want to be, but it’s the part that I need to  be.”

YOU need to get here! You need to have enough frustration that you choose to finally narrow your brand messaging down so people (including yourself!) understand it, and can even easily communicate it to others.  Yes, you can have a breadth of passions and interests.  But at some point you also have to help people understand what they should understand about you.

Are you ready yet?

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A Systematic, Process-Oriented Job Search #LizRyan

November 25th, 2014

I’m a sucker for a good job search story.  Enter a LinkedIn article by Liz Ryan, where she shares an awesome, inspiring letter from one of her job seeker clients, and then her reply.  Please read the entire thing – it’s kind of long but if you are in a job search, this will give you a boost that you just can’t get enough of!

How Doug Got Hired After Two Years of Searching

Doug’s story is our story… your story, my story.  We think that if we do a great job, we’ll have security (“I thought I was going to retire from that job.”).  We think that we can send out hundreds of resumes, because it’s a “numbers game,” and eventually someone is going to interview us and hire us.  We are absolutely appalled at the resume black hole and the salt-in-the-wound auto-responders.  Finally, when something comes along that gives us a semblance of control, we gravitate towards that.  We thirst for control, since we feel like we’ve been thrust into this dark fantasy world where we have NO control.  Doug talks about “Pain Letters” and a “consulting business card.”  It’s a great letter – read it here.

Liz responds with two awesome follow-up assignments that EVERY job seeker should do. The first is to get on LinkedIn, and get a good profile.  The second assignment is awesome:

“The second assignment is to write to everyone you met in your job search, and thank them. Tell them where you landed and thank them for their support, even if they didn’t really do anything.

That’s okay. Tell them that you appreciate having them in your network. Maybe your note will be the spark that grows their mojo just enough to do something nice for the next person they meet, or to take a step for themselves”

This is such a powerful assignment. I don’t even want to call it a recommendation because I think that devalues it. It’s not a suggestion… this is a must-do assignment.

I have heard from hundreds of coaches and career professionals that they all say something like this: “when you land your next job, you need to continue networking!

And the job seekers says “Yes, of course, I’ll never let my network get stagnant again!”  You feel repentant, you are humbled, and even though you don’t like networking, you swear you won’t fall behind on your relationships again.

BUT YOU DO.  You get busy onboarding yourself at your next job.  You can take a breather and release the stress of being unemployed.  You get to play a bit, and of course you don’t have to go to any networking events.  Whatever resolution you had gets swept away in the new routines.

YOu aren’t bad… you just need some ideas on how to network moving forward.  And Liz’s assignment, to reach out to every person you met in your job search (and the people you knew before that, who you were in touch with during your job search), is THE TACTIC that you need to pursue.

Awesome stuff. Click the image to read the whole thing:

jibberjobber_liz_ryan_linkedin_article_doug

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JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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New: Certified JibberJobber Coach

November 24th, 2014

Here’s what I just sent to my LinkedIn Group:

If your coach does not use JibberJobber, what CRM are they using? You should be using JibberJobber, and your coach should know the basics of relationship management software (that is, JibberJobber). Huge bonus if they actually use it for their own stuff, whether personal relationships, prospects, current and past clients, etc.If you are looking for a coach or service provider who uses JibberJobber, or has been to our trainings enough times to “get it,” let me know. I’ll put you in touch with coaches and resume writers and outplacement firms who “get it.”If you are a career professional, and are interested in becoming a Certified JibberJobber Coach, email me: Jason@JibberJobber.com. Classes will start in January.

Jason Alba
CEO
www.JibberJobber.com

I’ve been thinking about doing a certification like this for many years. It’s time to finally buckle down and put it together.

I’ll start the first course the week of January 12th. It will be four to eight weeks long, depending on the curriculum that I put together.  While I don’t have that ironed out, if you’ve been on my webinars, you know I fret about over-delivering, and this is no exception.

Every career professional knows the world doesn’t need another certification to take (or pay for), but no one is doing a certification on JibberJobber, or on using this type of technology to organize and track and manage a job search. I used to do the LinkedIn Certification for The Academies… why not do a JibberJobber certification?

The list price of $397 is discounted to $97 for students of the first group of students.  You can pay here. This will include the live and recorded video courses and the assessments (to test your proficiency of material covered). It will include a verification process so that job seekers can verify that you are really, truly certified by JibberJobber. The class will be live webinar with recordings, so if you can’t make the webinar, listen to the recordings at your own pace.

Fun factoid: certified, defined, is:

“Officially recognize someone as possessing certain qualifications or meeting certain standards.

On the same page, it is also defined as:

“Officially declare insane.”

The purpose of this certification is to bring career professionals up to speed on the processes and systems of organizing and tracking a job search. We will recognize those who go through the course successfully as professionals who “possess certain qualifications,” and who “meet certain standards.”  We will not officially declare anyone insane… :)

Questions? Suggestions? Let me know.

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Example of an ATS (Applicant Tracking System): ApplicantPro (and how to beat them)

November 14th, 2014

Let’s go a bit deeper on the Applicant Tracking System conversation that we started with Louise Kursmark’s comments.

When I see stuff like this it reminds me of when I first learned about it, when I was a job seeker, thinking how unfair it was that I had my stupid Excel spreadsheet to track my job search, and the people I was sending my resume to and interviewing with had sophisticated software.  No more!  Now the playing field is leveled, since you can use JibberJobber…. !

Want to see what an ATS is/does/looks like?  I found this company while poking around the internet and started digging around. I went to the Tour link and saw this 1:30 video.  If you are wondering what HR and recruiters might be using to figure out if you are worthy of an interview.  Here’s the video:

Sound interesting?  Here’s a 14 minute video from Gillian Kelly, a career pro and outplacement provider in Australia, talking about beating the ATS:

Remember, this does not apply to every company you apply to. Some will use an ATS, some will not (even if they have it).  My recommendation is still to network into the company before you play the “resume black hole” game.  That’s not a fun game.

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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10 Job Search Tricks, When Time Magazine Recommended JibberJobber

November 6th, 2014

Remember a couple of weeks ago when there was a Time Magazine article recommending JibberJobber?  I shared this with my team and one of my programmers wrote back and said “hey, we do two of the other ten things, too!”

My team is very proud of the breadth and depth of what they have developed!

Let me share a bit more of what we do.

The article says:

2. Use JibberJobber to Keep Track of Information You Collect During Your Job Search.  

This is a great observation, even though it’s something I don’t talk about enough.  But here’s how it works.  If you find information about a target company, contact, job opportunity, etc., and it might come in handy later, while you network or interview, you should collect the information.  Store it in JibberJobber, obviously.

Here are the other two from the list of ten:

8. Use Insightly to Manage and Organize Business Cards You Collect.

This function is usually referred to as “customer relationship management” (or, CRM).  This is what I normally talk about… and how most people describe JibberJobber: as a CRM!   So, I don’t want to talk anything away from Insightly, but I will suggest that JibberJobber is a great CRM designed especially for job seekers.  The job search process, networking into target companies, etc. is what we are all about.  Our free version is highly functional and quite awesome.  For a small optional fee you could have everything we have to offer.  (quick note on Insightly: their free version has 2,500 records, which is NOT the same as 2,500 contacts and/or companies.  Every note, email, etc. (stuff we would call Log Entries) counts as a record… which will add up).  I’m sure they have an awesome system, but my point is, we now hit two of the ten points of the Time article.

9. Use Contactually to Create an Automatic Follow-up System

Ah, the brilliance of a follow-up system!  I remember the phone call when I was talking to a user and he said “JibberJobber is my follow-up system!”  Ever since then I’ve thought about that… he didn’t refer to it as his organizational system, or tracking system, or CRM… but a follow-up system.  BRILLIANT.

I had been talking about the power of follow-up in my presentations, but never referred to JibberJobber as a follow-up system.  But I do now.  Keith Ferrazzi said “if you want to be more successful than 95% of your competition, all you need to do is follow-up.”  I didn’t match that concept with JibberJobber until my user said it was his follow-up system.  That is why we have introduced some of the features we have recently: to help you follow-up.  Time recommends Contactually, which is actually another CRM… it has some special tools to help you reconnect with people, or prompt you to reconnect with people.  JibberJobber will move into that realm, but the reason why my dev team said we do this is because of our “Recurring Action Items,” which is basically scheduling an Action Item to recur multiple times (like, “email Jason once a quarter.”)  We’ll have more functionality like what Contactually does down the road.  (you’ll find that all CRM systems leap-frog each other with features… one day you are ahead, the next day you are behind… )

As a job seeker, you won’t want to get THREE CRM tools.  Pick one.  More importantly, USE IT!  Picking “the best” CRM, but not using it is really a waste of time and energy.

Get it?  USE JibberJobber!  Don’t just sign up, but actually use it.  Your entire career could depend on it.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Break Down Expert Job Search Advice (say NO to the ATS!)

November 5th, 2014

louise_kursmark_headshotLet’s dig into the post from yesterday, and dissect some of Louise Kursmark’s advice.  It’s a short article, but there’s simple stuff that every job seeker needs to be doing. Lines from her post are in bold, my comments are not bold, and indented.

>> I think that obsession(with gaming the ATS systems) is a distraction from the real work of job search.

Again, you are hiding from the job search.  There is no silver bullet.  ATS is one tiny aspect of the job search, don’t become obsessed with gaming it.

>> Even if your resume is a perfect match for the job posting, you have a very small chance of being chosen for an interview. 

Why? Because statistically, jobs posted online are not real jobs that are begging real people to apply. Some (probably those from big companies) have already been filled with internal candidates, but are posted just to satisfy regulations or policy.  Others are, unfortunately, and without integrity, fake jobs that are luring people in just to collect names and numbers.  Sometimes they are just feeling out the market, and seeing what’s out there.  But for the real ones… have you heard how many people apply to openings?  It’s way to many, really.  And those that are getting through are not necessarily the right candidates.  Many right candidates are getting weeded out through errors in the logic of the automated system.  They don’t call it the “resume black hole” for nothing.

>> … it’s easy to spend a lot of fruitless time trying to rise to the top of a very large pool.

Lots and lots of people are playing this losing game.  Why throw your hat into a system that is proven to be so ineffective and discouraging, and really, one that doesn’t really work?  Especially when there are more effective ways to land a job.

>> My advice: Have a keyword-rich, simply formatted resume that stands a reasonable chance of making it through the ATS.

And here is the simple truth about what you need for a resume.  Keyword rich and simple format.  That’s it.  Do that, then MOVE ON to the next part of your job search strategy!

>> Then, spend less time applying to posted openings and more time getting referrals into the companies you’re interested in.

Get out of the resume black hole and go compete in a different space… the competition is much easier, and nicer, because too many people are afraid to network, or are doing it entirely wrong.  Be the person who learns to love it (you don’t have to be an extrovert to love networking), and do it RIGHT!  Also, to Louise’s points, do this purposefully and strategically, not haphazardly.

>> Use your network to find a connection, ask for an introduction, and start a dialogue.

This, my friends, is networking.  This is more effective than going to network meetings, being nervous or shy, and then going home thinking “I networked!”  You may have, but what Louise is suggesting is to do it right, and go deeper, and be relationship-focused.

>> Rather than applying for a job, have a conversation about the company’s needs and how someone with your background might be able to help.

Again, this is networking.  And this hints to informational interviews as well!

>> Become a real person rather than a piece of paper or collection of keywords.

You do this by focusing on conversations, relationships and real networking, rather than throwing your resume into the black hole…

>> Even if you don’t (get interviews), you’ve built another strand in your web of connections that will ultimately lead you to your next job.

Building these strands, or let’s go further and say this fabric, is what I call career management. It is having strong relationships over time, not just during this hard transition, and it is helping people understand who you are (and how they can help you)… it is long-term.  It is the new “job security,” and it’s all in your control.  It’s why I say you need to use JibberJobber, forever! (yes, a little fanatical there, but I get to do that on my own blog :) )

>> And isn’t it more satisfying to have a colleague-to-colleague business discussion than to be judged (and rejected) based on a mysterious set of keyword qualifications?

You know who has control over the keywords?  NOT YOU!  You have control over, which means influence on, your relationships and communication, but not on the arbitrary keywords that someone chose. And you don’t have control over who else applies, or how their resumes compare to yours in the ATS black box logic.  Work on what you can control… !

I love Louise’s no-nonsense advice… thanks again for letting me share it!

 

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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What Is an ATS? Should You Care? #jobsearch #resume

November 4th, 2014

For a few years the new buzz word in training for resume writers is how to write a resume to get through the ATS system.

ATS is “applicant tracking system,” which is kind of like JibberJobber for the recruiter.  They aren’t tracking a relationship with YOU as much as they are tracking specific job openings, who applies, and who gets to have an interview with a human.

I guess that is tracking you, kind of. But only as far as that specific opportunity goes.  There is no relationship nurturing going on… it’s all about filling open jobs, and weeding out the high percentage of people who shouldn’t have applied in the first place.

You can imagine how resume writers want to write a resume that will get through the ATS, and eventually get to the live person.  I haven’t completely wrapped my brain around the technology, but I’ve understood that most jobs people are hired for are with companies that are smaller, and might not even know what ATS means.  I’ve focused my advice more on networking into a job than on monkeying around with your resume to get it better (which I call “hiding from your job search,” since you can do that for days and weeks and not really get any closer to getting an interview).

But I keep my ears open to what the experts are saying, and am always looking for any information I can share with you.  When I saw this article on LinkedIn from Louise Kursmark, I knew it would have important information.  I think this is a super-important perspective because she is a well-known resume writer who has trained hundreds, maybe thousands, of resume writers. Louise gave me permission to repost her article here (original post)… I hope this helps you with your job search strategy today!

ATS: I Couldn’t Care Less

louise_kursmark_headshotATS – Applicant Tracking Systems – cause a lot of twitter and chatter among job seekers and resume writers. I might even call it an obsession about finding the keywords, mimicking the job posting, and designing the document to get through the automated screener.

Personally, I think that obsession is a distraction from the real work of job search.

Even if your resume is a perfect match for the job posting, you have a very small chance of being chosen for an interview. That’s because your resume is one of dozens or even hundreds competing for just a handful of top slots. It’s likely at least a few other candidates will have qualifications that are slightly stronger or a background that’s just a bit closer to the ideal specified by the recruiter or employer.

So it’s easy to spend a lot of fruitless time trying to rise to the top of a very large pool. And when you don’t, you feel frustrated, discouraged, maybe even depressed and angry.

My advice: Have a keyword-rich, simply formatted resume that stands a reasonable chance of making it through the ATS. Then, spend less time applying to posted openings and more time getting referrals into the companies you’re interested in.

Use your network to find a connection, ask for an introduction, and start a dialogue. Rather than applying for a job, have a conversation about the company’s needs and how someone with your background might be able to help. Become a real person rather than a piece of paper or collection of keywords.

Chances are very good that you’ll be able to parlay many of those conversations into actual interviews for real jobs. Even if you don’t, you’ve built another strand in your web of connections that will ultimately lead you to your next job.

And isn’t it more satisfying to have a colleague-to-colleague business discussion than to be judged (and rejected) based on a mysterious set of keyword qualifications?

Thank you, Louise, for a real perspective and great advice!  There really is no way around doing some of the hard work in the job search!

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