Work, Vision, and Lots of Stage Time #LessonsFromASpeaker

May 10th, 2016

jason_hewlett_headshotI saw an ad on Facebook from a guy that I am probably destined to know: the speaker/entertainer Jason Hewlett. I say I’m probably destined to know him because (a) we have a mutual friend who talks about him a lot, and (b) I hear he has been active at SLC National Speakers Association chapter meetings, which I used to go to every month (and someday might go back to).

Here’s the first part of his Facebook ad (here’s his video that explains what the ad is about):

“In the past week I have received 5 urgent messages from speakers and entertainers asking how I’ve had such success in this business. The questions are all the same and people are shocked when I reply that it takes work, vision, and lots of stage time.”

This struck me because I’ve been writing about job search for almost 10 years now, and the questions seem to be about the same, and the answers seem to be about the same. I even got to the point, a few years ago, where I wrote “well, there’s nothing else to write about this stuff… it’s all been written.”

Jason’s reply has three parts, and they absolutely applicable to you:

Work: There really is no way around this… work has to be done. Sure, you could get lucky… but what you want (more money, a better job, owning your own gig, selling your own creation, that next promotion, etc.) will most likely require a lot of work. it could be manual labor, it could be deep thinking, it could be working through bureaucracy (aka, playing the game), it could be working on yourself (which is really hard work!) or helping others work on themselves… instead of having “work” be a scary “four letter word,” let’s embrace work, and appreciate the opportunity we have to work. Let’s make the fact that we have to work something that is okay!

Vision: If we don’t have a vision, then what are we working for?  “I want to be a….”, “I want to have….”, “I want to help…” are all statements that will help us know WHY we do what we do. Having a vision is especially helpful when we are faced with a hard task, or troubling times.  Vision strongly correlates with hope… and if we do not have hope, then why in the world do the hard things?  Do not let your vision (or hope) die… you’ll come to rely on it many, many times.

Lots of stage time: So you are a hard worker… and you have a great vision. You are doing great!  Whether you want to be on stage as a professional speaker or not, you need to be in front of your audience. For introverted software developers that might mean participation in online forums… for marketing professionals that might mean a blog on marketing from your perspective, for wannabe executives, that might mean hobnobbing with executives. Whatever “stage time” means to you, let me share two important points: First, Jason says to get LOTS of it. This doesn’t just happen… you have to (a) actively seek it out, and (b) when opportunities come your way, you say YES.  You want LOTS of stage time. Second, YOU WILL FAIL. I have presented hundreds of times, and some of you might know I’ve failed more than once. Once I failed so bad I seriously considered just not speaking anymore.  It was an embarrassing failure. I did take a few weeks off, but I knew that I needed to get back on the (speaking) horse. I did… and later on, I failed again, and again, and … then I found myself failing less frequently. I got BETTER. I learned from my mistakes. But I wouldn’t have learned from my mistakes if I hasn’t made them. Get LOTS of stage time so you can learn to be better.

Thanks for these three suggestions, Jason! This is a great path for an aspiring speaker, and it’s definitely a great path for you and your career!

 

 

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The Power of Job Clubs and Job Ministries

May 6th, 2016

This week I shared this with my two LinkedIn Groups (Job Search Career Network and the JibberJobber Career Management Group):

When I go back to the church where I went to my weekly job club (aka career ministry), ten years ago, my knees still get weak. I get nervous about sharing my 30 second pitch, and “networking.” You see, I’m an introvert, and walking into a room full of job seekers is not my idea of a “good time.”

But this job club was perhaps one of the most important things I had done as a job seeker. I went from doing this job search thing alone, in my house, to talking to others and really figuring out what I could do better, and as important, realizing that I wasn’t alone in this seemingly horrible journey. I got support and training, and I’ve been an advocate of job clubs ever since.

Humbling myself, going regularly, and even participating, defined the pivotal point in my job search. Even though I chose to start JibberJobber, instead of pursue a job, the time I spent with others, serving and getting served, brought me out of my depression and hopelessness.

My question to you is this: what job clubs are in your area that you go to, or would recommend? Let’s get a list of these resources, participate where we can, and encourage others to go. Leave a comment or email me and let me know about job clubs local to you.

Here’s a blog post I wrote about this back in 2008:http://www.jibberjobber.com/blog/2008/07/09/get-value-out-of-job-ministries-even-when-you-arent-religous/ Check out the comments, which as usual, are more valuable than the post.

In those posts, the groups people talked about include:

  • Sacrament, CA: Bayside’s Career Coaching
  • D.C. area: McLean Bible Church (I’ve spoken there multiple times)
  • San Diego area: NC3 Career Transitions
  • Madison, AL: St. Joseph the Worker Job Networking Club
  • Hoffman Estates, IL: St. Hubert Catholic Church

What are job clubs or ministries that you recommend, or know about?

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LinkedIn Summary vs. LinkedIn Experience Sections

March 29th, 2016

I got this question from Derek, who saw my LinkedIn Optimization course on Pluralsight (which you can get access to for free… read below):

“I just completed the course on LinkedIn Profile Optimization and feel that I have a strong above the fold profile which the video was mainly focused on.

The video didn’t focus on the experience section and what to write based off what you did at the company. You touched on writing mini stories for the summary and experience sections, I am not sure writing only mini stories will give the best overall picture in the experience section. Do you have another video on pluralsight that helps enhance the content for the experience section?”

This is a great question. After doing group trainings and one-on-one consultations for years, I feel like my “best answer” is jelling pretty good. Of course, there are exceptions, but in 99% of the one-on-one consultations I do, and the Profile critiques I’ve done, the answer below will be appropriate.

It’s critical to think about the LinkedIn Profile as one single marketing document.  If you break up the sections of the Profile, and think about them as a critical reader (recruiter, hiring manager, prospective funder, partner, prospect, customer, etc.) might, you could probably guess that some parts are more important than others.  For example, your Professional Headline is not only at the top, but it’s a part of your “mini profile,” and seen in other places on LinkedIn (other than your Profile page). On the other hand, the best way to contact me, or the seeking sections, are largely ignored (by design, because they are so far down the Profile).

If we think about the Profile as a single marketing document, the question is, what is the single message of the document?  I am now counseling my consultation customers to have that single message communicated in a concise and clean way in the Professional Headline.  This is what I call your “main claim,” or your primary claim.  Then, your Summary has five to seven secondary claims, ALL OF THEM SUPPORTING THE MAIN CLAIM.  These can be communicated in various ways, my favorite of which is the mini-stories.

You can see all of this in action in my LinkedIn Profile Optimization course on Pluralsight for free.  How?  JibberJobber users get a free 30 day pass to Pluralsight, which means you can watch this, and dozens of my other courses (including the LinkedIn Proactive Strategies course), during your 30 day window.  Click here to see how you can have access within a 60 seconds – no credit card required.

Okay, so in the Pluralsight course, it’s clear how to position the secondary claims and make your Summary much better than the status quo.  Derek gets that, but wonders what to do in the Experience section, which some people call the job description – the parts in each of the jobs you list in your Profile. This really isn’t a job description, although some people treat it that way. I suggest you make this more about YOU and less about the job.

How do you do that?

I think the best way is to use the exact same strategy as what you used in the Summary section. That is, secondary claims (that all support the primary claim in the Professional Headline), with mini-stories that (a) present the claim, (b) give a “for example,” and (c) quantify the results.

Mini-stories are SO powerful. When you align them with your primary claim, you give further evidence and support that your primary claim is valid, and that you are focused and understand your value.

What I normally see is resume-like statements that are super concise, and super dry and boring. Worse, they look cliche. They look like what anyone else would write that has your same job history, and is making the same claims, and is looking for the same job you are looking for.

Okay, you think, maybe that’s not so bad.  To be honest with you, having resume-speak on your Profile is better than the weak, non-information that I see on too many Profiles. So kudos for having anything that helps me understand you more.

But what I’d rather see you have in your “experience” sections are mini-stories that each (a) make a claim, (b) give me a meaty for-example, and (c) tell me why it matters (ie, the quantification)… this is what we accomplish with mini-stories, and (d) support the primary claim. This last part is important so the reader doesn’t get sidetracked by irrelevant information.

That’s my recommendation… from the summary all the way down through the Experience section… claims, quantification, and alignment.

Do you have a different idea? Leave a comment and let us know!

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How To Marry Excel and Word for Mass Letters

March 28th, 2016

I did this many, many moons ago. It takes a little bit of work, but not too much. If you want to send mass letters that look customized (based on the name of the recipient), here’s how you do it: How to use Microsoft Excel and Word to send multiple emails.

This post was written in 2009 by Walt Feigenson, a friend in the Silicon Valley area. We met when I was in town a few years back, speaking at some job clubs, and the last time I saw him was at his house for dinner (on a different trip).  The stories he has of the history of software, which he was involved with, are awesome.

And this merge technique, which might feel a little dated, is really quite powerful.  YMMV, based on editions of Word/Excel… if yours doesn’t work the way he describes, figure it out and let me know in the comments what is different :) (that is a tactful way of saying: I’m not tech support for this tactic – good luck :))

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21 Surprising Ways To Waste Time In Your Job Search #FavoriteFriday

March 25th, 2016

Almost a year ago I wrote 21 Surprising Ways To Waste Time In Your Job Search.  As I look over the list, each point is as relevant today as it was then.

Don’t cheat your job search.  Don’t rationalize that you need to veg, chill, or recharge, when you are really just avoiding the hard work that needs to get done.

Check out the list (it’s a quick read), and then get on to the work that you really need to do today!

 

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How To Network Like a Veteran

March 23rd, 2016

Here’s a great post by Chad Storlie on Every Veteran Hired: 10 Steps to Networking Success: An Easy (and Effective) Strategy

You may not be military-trained, but that shouldn’t stop you from understanding and following the 10 steps. This is more than a cute article with some cute ideas… I strongly urge you to follow each of the steps, in order.

Except, of course, Step 5, which says to use a spreadsheet for your contacts. Obviously you would use JibberJobber.  You can start with a spreadsheet, but as you network more you’ll find the spreadsheet becomes a rats nest of information, and soon it becomes unusable.

Check it out!

 

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Fear the Phone!

March 21st, 2016

My friend Alison Doyle, author at the Job Search channel at About.com, shared this on Facebook over the weekend:

phone_call_dinasour

I love this.  I’m don’t always feel this way, but there are some calls that I dread. As I’ve thought about calls for job seekers, and now calls for JibberJobber sales, I’ve wondered if the reason we dread making calls is because of the fear of personal rejection. If they don’t want what we have to offer, we take it personally.

Whatever the reason is, let me suggest a great strategy for working through (rather than getting over) your fear of making phone calls. It is:

Pick up the phone, dial the number, and when they answer, have a conversation and ask your question (or, state why you are calling).

That’s it.  Just START.

Years ago I wrote about the “chicken list.” The idea is that you have a list of people you are scared to contact… and they never get scratched off of your list… this nags at you day after day, week after week.  I challenged you go just CALL the person on your list and get it over with, so you can scratch them off.

Need some motivation?  Check out these posts:

Get Out Your Chicken List And Make A Call

Chicken List Is Out – Now Put Away The Honey-Do List!

The Chicken List Smackdown Video: Just Place The Call

Job Search Chicken List: It’s Monday! Call someone!

I triple-dog dare you to pick up the phone TODAY

And here’s the benefit/bonus post:

Self-Control leads to Self-Confidence

Cross the person off the list… make the call… conquer this fear… and your self confidence will grow.  I’ve done it, and I continue to do it, and it works!

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city, state or zip jobs by job search

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Cover Letters Are About Preference: Here’s Mine

March 15th, 2016

Since announcing my contract sales positions on LinkedIn, Facebook, and this blog, I’ve gotten a number of emails. Some of them ask for more information. Others include a resume.  Not many include what has historically been called a “cover letter.”  “Experts” have poo-pooed the cover letters for years, causing job seekers to wonder “should I include a cover letter?”

Here’s a recent post citing a hiring manager at Bain on cover letters, which he says are NOT OPTIONAL.

My experience is this: I honestly have no idea if you are doing the “spray and pray” method of job search, if you are really interested in doing sales, or if you are going to give this an honest effort.

The lesson learned, for me, is that cover letters are ESSENTIAL.  I want to know that I’m not just a number, and that you read up on the opportunity and that you know something about JibberJobber.  Bonus, of course, if you are a JibberJobber user.

If you send me an email with just a resume, I don’t have much to go on.  You are asking me to sift through all kinds of data and draw a conclusion that amounts to “this person would be great for this job!”   Don’t make me sift, and don’t make me draw conclusions… give me, in your cover letter, helpful information, such as:

  • that you think you are qualified for the job, because ________.  I was talking to a recruiter who said that 80% of the applications he got (which was over 10,000 a month) were NOT QUALIFIED.  Come on people… we are better than that.  Want to stand out, and be part of the 20% the recruiter wants to seriously look at?  Tell the recruiter or hiring manager that, and why, you are qualified.
  • That you are interested in this job, and think you could excel at it, and why. Are you self-motivated? A hard worker? Driven by a commission-based compensation model, which means you have unlimited earning potential?  Do you have lots of recruiter and HR contacts?  Have you done sales before, and you are ready to get a lot of “no” answers while you find the “yes” answers? Are you a relationship builder, and love to help people come to proper solutions?

Can you ask questions? Sure.  You can let me know that you have some questions, and you look forward to learning more.  We could do that on a phone interview, or you could email me your questions.  But realize that getting me on the phone is as valuable as getting a prospect on the phone… you want to start that relationship (and so do I).

Let’s get a little more personal, and have more of a human touch.  Please, please start sending this type of information as you apply.  For every recruiter that poo-poos the idea of a cover letter, realize that there is an inexperienced hiring manager looking at this stuff who really wants more than just your name and a resume, which somehow looks the same as the thirty other resumes they’ve just been given.

 

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Contract Sales Opportunity: Sell Job Postings to Employers for JibberJobber

March 14th, 2016

I recently announced I’m offering contract sales opportunities for salespeople with JibberJobber.  You can read my original announcement here.

In response to inquiries, I am putting together a document for people who ask for more information.  Let me know if you want this document… the questions I answer in this document include:

  • What is JibberJobber?
  • What is the opportunity?
  • Why might you want to do this?
  • What is the sales cycle?
  • How much can I make?
  • What is the sales price?
  • How can I get started – where do I go from here?
  • What is JibberJobber’s value proposition?
  • How is selling JJ Job postings different than selling monster, career, etc.?
  • But…I have never done sales… can I still do this?
  • Is there really a market for job postings?

Sound interesting?  Email me with a resume, your LinkedIn Profile, and seriously, try to sell yourself a little to me (aka, send me a cover letter, which could be the body of your email).

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What if networking is not working? Or, how to network…

March 9th, 2016

A few years back someone said “I am not sure I know how to network.”  This person wanted guidance on how to greet someone, how to make conversation, what to talk about, etc.

Networking is supposedly the way most of us will find a job.  But some of us don’t (well) do it because (a) we don’t know how, or (b) we are uncomfortable doing it, or a combination of those.

Here are some fun posts I wrote years ago that touch on networking:

Networking Doesn’t Work April 2008

Networking Doesn’t Work (part II) – agree? August 2010

Why Networking Sucks In The Job Search (aka, Why Networking Isn’t Working) December 2008

 

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