How To Get Around the Ridiculous LinkedIn Search Limitations

February 24th, 2015

I blogged about this here: Bogus: LinkedIn search limits

I’ve been following threads by people who do LinkedIn training, like career counselors, and individuals who own their own business.  This limitation hampers their ability to promote LinkedIn, and even show how to do a good search, in LinkedIn.  Paying for a normal account might not even solve the problem.

Until someone at LinkedIn wakes up and pulls the plug on this horrific limitation that is only making LinkedIn unusable by people (ask me how I really feel), I’ll suggest a workaround for you.

I actually blogged about the hack back in 2011 (and a few other times): Do you use Site:______ in Google searches?  I DO! (I even have pretty color coded pictures on that blog post)

Here’s what you do: instead of going into LinkedIn to do a search for a person, place, company, etc., just do it in Google. It’s a normal search, but at the beginning of the search box you put this:

site:linkedin.com

You can copy and paste that… all it does is says “Google, do a search for “_______” but only search on this one website, which happens to be LinkedIn. A few things to note:

  1. This works on other search engines (but they might have different way to do it). You can even do it on LinkedIn (see here)
  2. This is the super simple way to do it… you can get much more advanced. Check out the four examples listed towards the top of this post.
  3. The search results come back in Google (or whatever search engine you are using), which means it doesn’t count against your search quota in LinkedIn.
  4. You don’t even have to login to LinkedIn to do this.
  5. Google isn’t limiting your search results, yet :p

There you go – enjoy this fix for now.  Hopefully you won’t have to for long.

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

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Focus Friday: Exporting Contacts from LinkedIn

February 19th, 2015

It took a while for me to get this video posted because I had to have part of the video blurred out for privacy.

You might remember that our Focus Friday sessions, which are 10 minutes of training focused on one particular thing (and then as much time as we need to answer all of your questions) has morphed into a “getting started on JibberJobber” video series.  The next logical video was how to export contacts from LinkedIn.

You can sign up to get weekly invitations (links) to join us on each Focus Friday webinar here.  You can also watch archived Focus Friday recordings here.  Note that if you scroll from the bottom up, you’ll see, in order, the getting started videos! In other words, since I started recording these, I have planned them for newbies, in an order that makes sense to get up and running on JibberJobber.

Here’s last week’s video.  Tomorrow morning on the Focus Friday we’ll go through the import process on JibberJobber.

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Bogus: LinkedIn search limits

February 13th, 2015

From the Office of Face Palms at LinkedIn comes another ridiculous move to make you upgrade.  Have you heard about this?  You will only be able to search a certain amount of times, or see a certain number of search results, and then you are cut off.  Here’s my message, right in line with the search results of a name:

linkedin_limit

Are you kidding me?  

Here’s what I did: I did a search for a name on Google… and then clicked on the LinkedIn result that would show me all of the people with that first and last name.  I scroll down and bit and see that in fact I have been penalized for clicking on that link.

I do this regularly.

This is seriously dumb.  Unless you are at LinkedIn, and want to force people to upgrade, but with the alternatives that are coming out, and the change in direction and value that LinkedIn has, I think this is one more thing that will drive usage and value down.

I was on a call with some career center directors today from a school that everyone’s heard of and we spent too much time talking about how LinkedIn has decreased in value for people who want to network.

WHAT?

That’s what they were set up for in the first place! To help people network!

Things have changed.  Networking is harder on LinkedIn.  And people have noticed, and they are tired of it.

This limit is one more thing that makes me think “okay, if I can’t find it on LinkedIn, I’m going to go somewhere else.”  Which is exactly what I’ve been hearing from recruiters… they are going somewhere else.

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job title, keywords or company
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LinkedIn Connections Are Not The End Goal

January 19th, 2015

I have gotten thousands of invitations to connect over the years.  Mainly this is because I have a pretty public persona, from starting JibberJobber, and then writing the book on LinkedIn. I have spoken across the US and have done many webinars to global audiences.  So people send me invitations… which I don’t have a problem with.

What I do have a problem with is the idea that getting a connection on LinkedIn seems to be the end goal.

In my LinkedIn trainings I’ve suggested that once you start a relationship with someone, you DO NOT ask them to connect with you on LinkedIn – yet.  Why?  Because connecting on LinkedIn, many times, means “we’re done communicating.”  It’s the end.  I have reached my goal, I have won.

Think about it – how many times have you connected with someone on LinkedIn, and then you never hear from them again?  How many times have you had a good conversation with someone, then invited them to LinkedIn, and then stopped communicating with them?

I’ve seen this too many times.  So my suggestion is to build the relationship more, and eventually connect… but make it clear that you are interested in the relationship a lot more than a somewhat meaningless connection on social media.

Go back to Friday’s post, about getting beyond superficial.  If you have a superficial relationship, and you connect, you haven’t really moved beyond superficial…. too many times, this end goal is a dead end.

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Awesome LinkedIn Professional Headline

December 31st, 2014

I was surfing my LinkedIn contacts and found a profile of Mike Dodson, a guy I met a few years ago at an entrepreneur networking event.  I LOVE LOVE LOVE Mike’s Professional Headline:

jibberjobber_linkedin_professional_headline

 

As an entrepreneur I can read that he is successful, has failed (and probably has a lot of lessons learned), and isn’t done yet… !

How is your LinkedIn Professional Headline?  If you haven’t ever changed it, I can almost guarantee is needs work.  Here’s a great resource for helping you develop your own strong Professional Headline: a blog post with a super awesome comment thread.

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

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Discounted LinkedIn Profile Critique/Consultation

November 13th, 2014

I just sent this out to my LinkedIn Group… to get on that “newsletter” go to this page and find the Join button.

Once again I’m discounting my LinkedIn Profile consultation from $97 to $47 for a limited time.

Many of you know I was “the first” to write a LinkedIn book (now in the fourth edition). In fact, one person wrote his before me, so I was “the second.” I’m cool with that.

What you might not know is that I’m a nerd for communicating on our Profiles. While I have a bit of “cobbler’s kids” syndrome (that is, he made shoes but his kids were barefoot), I do love picking apart other people’s Profiles and seeing where there is opportunity for improvement.

I focus on (1) being found, which is usually about the search engine and showing up on the front page, and (2) being readable in an engaging, interesting way.  What I didn’t say in the newsletter: I also focus on giving you actionable advice…. stuff you can actually do.

I loathe jargon and cliche, and I love helping you stand out in a way that not many do.

If this sounds interesting to you, you can pay at the link below and then send me your profile information. I’ll do a recording of my critique, which might be from 12 minutes to 20+ minutes (depending on how much you have to critique, usually), and then I send you a video file you can watch as often as you want.

https://www.jibberjobber.com/pay.php?amount=47

I have done this for executives, professionals, entry-level, solopreneurs, career coaches, resume writers, branding specialists, outplacement pros (and their candidates (actually, for outplacement firms I offer a higher level, one-on-one service for their candidates))… it’s been a fun opportunity to help so many people.

A few months ago I did a critique for Tom, who I’ve known for years as someone who is very strategic about his career management, networking and branding. He already had a very good profile. After he watched the critique, these are some of the things he wrote to me:

“WOW! You’ve provided a great deal of excellent advise.”

“Fortunately I’m not in transition but I want to be ready for my next move no matter who’s choice it is…”

“EXCELLENT point about the professional headline. I definitely need to add …”

“Yet more excellent feedback about my volunteer work for… “

“You have provided a wealth of information and I thank you for that. It certainly is hard to be objective about myself so you’ve really helped me see many areas that I can improve my profile to help recruiters get to know me not just my skills and experience.”

I don’t normally get depth of feedback from people, but like I said, Tom is purposeful, and there is a reason he has weathered career transitions so well.

I want my JibberJobber users to have short, less painful transitions. Building our brands and nurturing our network is a big part of that. Shall we do this together? Click on the link above and I’ll do my part… :)

Jason Alba
CEO of www.JibberJobber.com
Author of www.ImOnLinkedInNowWhat.com

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JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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How to Block People on LinkedIn

October 6th, 2014

On Facebook my colleague and well-respected career expert Susan Whitcomb asked if there was a way to block people from seeing updates in LinkedIn.  The typical scenerio is that someone starts a job search, and wants to NOT broadcast that to their network.  They might update their resume, post an “update” on the homepage, participate in groups, etc…. how do you block individuals from seeing what you are doing?

The short answer is, YOU CANNOT.

This question about privacy reminds me of my IT security professor back in the 90′s who said that if you want or expect any privacy, UNPLUG your computer from the internet.  Period.

You really shouldn’t have any assumption or expectation of privacy online, ever.

In LinkedIn, there aren’t any foolproof ways to shut people out of what you are doing.  In fact, you can’t even do that in Facebook.

Let me give you an example. Facebook has more refined personal privacy options than LinkedIn does, partially because of what Facebook is for and what LinkedIn is for.  Anyway, even with the very tight privacy settings in Facebook, it’s possible to *think* you are ranting privately, and you kind of are.  But what if one of your “friends” shares your rant with someone you mutually know, who you have blocked?

The rant isn’t so private anymore, is it?

What if they take a screenshot of your rant and post it on a blog?

Not private at all, huh?

You can have all the locks in place, but as long as humans are involved, there is potential for social engineering, which means that your update you thought was private is now shared in the lunchroom and boardrooms of your current company.

OOPS.

Are there security options in LinkedIn to block?  Kind of.

Should you trust them?  Only if… well, actually, NO.  NEVER.

But what if you aren’t connected with anyone at your company?

Um… let me explain how LinkedIn works: it doesn’t matter!

They can go to LinkedIn and still see some (most) of your stuff.  They can also do a search on Google and find some (most) of your stuff.  LinkedIn, by it’s nature, is a place to find and be found, to be visible, to share your brand, experience, etc.  It’s not a place to hide stuff.  That’s what a diary is for (you know, the book you write stuff in, and it’s not connected to the Internet!?).

Like I said, there are some technical privacy tools in place, kind of … BUT none of those matter as long as ANYONE in your network might share what you posted with their contacts… who just might be your boss you are trying to hide from.

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

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What Are Your Guiding Principles?

October 3rd, 2014

david_safeer_headshotI get David Safeer’s newsletters, and this was had an idea that was too good to not share. David is a management and leadership consultant – read about him on the front page of his site.  He’s done a very nice job communicating who he is and why he is relevant to his right audience.

In his most recent newsletter he shares his “business principles,” which are business principles “to achieve outstanding performance.”  It made me wonder, what are my business (or life, or marriage, or father, or entrepreneur, or CEO, or product manager, etc.) principles?

He says he wrote these almost ten years ago, and that reviewing them now, there are NO changes to make.  To me that indicates they are indeed principles instead of tactics, which can and usually should change over time.  Go check out his list – it really reads like a short book on how to do better in business.

As I read his list I had three thoughts:

  1. His list is about people and relationships, not about numbers.  He says: “I am convinced that people are THE key to a successful organization, so my thoughts about business principles turn often to the people side of things.”  Where do your thoughts about your principles turn?
  2. Can you create your own list of principles?  This could be like a personal business plan, or map, that helps you make decisions and be true to yourself.  What would be on your list?
  3. Once you have a list, this is a great way for you to stay relevant. How?  Read on…

Being relevant is an interesting concept.  When I started JibberJobber I thought people would talk about me and JibberJobber for a long time. I got interest and buzz at first, but then things died down, and I found I had to continually put something interesting and/or new in front of people.  I wrote a book on LinkedIn, and that did it (for a while).  But then 40 other people wrote books on LinkedIn, and I wasn’t THE expert anymore. I was losing relevance.  I had to do other things, which I did. I still do other things to stay in front of people and try to stay relevant.

Why do you think LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook make so many changes to their systems? Some are good and needed, others are simply to get press.

When David put his guiding principles in front of me, he shot back up to “relevant.”

Think about this for YOU.  What can you do to remain relevant with your audience?

Don’t get me wrong, this is not just a branding/networking thing. I think having guiding principles is AWESOME.  I encourage you to work on your own.  And, use what you come up with as a reason to get back in front of your network contacts and create a bit of buzz or conversation.

 

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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LinkedIn Messaging Part II: The Dangers of Asynchronous Communication (including email)

August 13th, 2014

Yesterday I wrote a post titled Why You Shouldn’t Message Me On LinkedIn. The main argument was LinkedIn’s lack of auto-reply feature, which means that even if I set up a vacation message in my email, I can’t do that in my LinkedIn messaging system (aka, inbox). Note to LinkedIn: if you are going to “fix” that, please let me also create an “email signature”…!

Anyway, in the comments, Lamar asks about sending gmail messages, and getting those bounce back. He argues that his gmail activity is less reliable then sending messages via LinkedIn…

SO WHAT IS THE RIGHT ANSWER?  

Let me clarify that I’m not solely talking about technological success (whether the message you sent was actually received in the person’s inbox).  I’m talking about whether the reader will actually see the message.  Having something sent to the mailbox, but filed in spam or junk, is a failure.  In my opinion, sending something to someone’s Gmail account and having it not be in the Primary tab is a failure.  I use the Gmail corporate service for my JibberJobber email, and I find that too often my @JibberJobber emails are not received by the recipient, because their email spam filters don’t like Gmail’s DNS servers (and perhaps other things that Gmail is doing).  That is lame and unfortunate… Gmail should clean that up. BUT, there are too many factors (like the 3rd party email blacklists, which sometimes are created by some shady guy with no ethics and a chip on his shoulder, working in a poorly lit apartment with energy drinks and empty pizza boxes strewn around his lonely room).  Nothing you can do about that.  Too bad corporations give his input any value :(

In communicating with a human being, though, the real issue comes down to asynchronous communication.

Has anyone ever said something like “why didn’t you do that think I asked you to do?  I texted you!

Um, maybe because I didn’t get the text?!?!

But I texted you!

Sounds like a weak argument, doesn’t it?

When you really need communication to happen, you need to confirm it happened.  Just because you texted someone doesn’t mean that (a) their phone registered the text, and (b) they say the text.

One definition of asynchronous is “not occurring at the same time.”  That, my friends, is text, email, LinkedIn messaging, etc.

In a face-to-face conversation (or phone call, chat, etc.) you have someone who says something, and someone else who can respond immediately.  Even if it is through body language, the response, or the conversation, is “occurring at the same time.”

If you want to know if someone heard you, you can ask “did you hear me?”

If you want to know if someone saw your text/email/message, you could ask them.  Or you could wait for them to respond.  But you can’t assume that any asynchronous communication is going to be received and read (much less responded to) immediately.

Check out this quote, in an article talking about asynchronous communication:

“Sometimes people have to wait hours, days, and even weeks to get a response to a message or feedback…”

It really doesn’t matter what method of asynchronous communication you use, there will always be the element of a gamble (did the user get the message??).

In yesterday’s post, I recommended you not send me a message through LinkedIn, if you really want to get a response from me (or have me see your message).  But really, any other method, except face-to-face, will have similar risks.  I just find that my email is much more reliable than the LinkedIn messaging system, and how my email system interacts with it.

Which gamble are you going to take?

And how can you ensure your communications are being received and responded to?

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

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Why You Shouldn’t Message Me On LinkedIn

August 12th, 2014

Last week I was out of the office all week.  Two weeks earlier I was out for an entire week.  I was at camps with my kids and really didn’t have access to anything online.

I dutifully set up my “out of office” messages in my two main email systems, knowing that anyone who sent me an email would have known that I would take a few days to get back to them.  Unfortunately, I got a number of messages through LinkedIn’s messaging system… and those people didn’t get any message to let them know I was unavailable.

They just got radio silence.  Sounds an awful lot like being ignored.  Or that I don’t care to respond.

LinkedIn is cool, for sure.  But it’s not the only tool you should use.  Use email, or the phone, but don’t solely message people through LinkedIn.

If you don’t know someone’s email address, GET IT.  If you have it, USE IT.

The other reason I suggest you don’t use LinkedIn for primary or important messaging (if you aren’t doing important messaging, don’t send the message!) is because messages from LinkedIn don’t get in front of me very often.  A while back Google (Gmail) decided they needed to sift my email into three groups (they could have just named tabs 2 and 3 SPAM, right?):

gmail_buckets

Guess where I spend most of my time?

The “Primary” box.

Guess where your LinkedIn message goes?

NOT the “Primary” box.

Don’t use Gmail, so that’s not an issue?  I suggest you check out your spam or junk folder, and see how many LinkedIn messages are in there.  That should be proof enough that you shouldn’t depend on LinkedIn for sending messages.

Want to get on my radar?  EMAIL ME directly.

Sending me a message through LinkedIn is a gamble.

How about you?

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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