Find a Career You Love Webinar (Anna Runyan)

October 9th, 2014

anna_runyan_headshotYesterday TheMuse.com author and career coach Anna Runyan included JibberJobber in her 10 Job Search Tricks That Will Change Everything You’ve Been Doing article.  She said to “use JibberJobber to keep track of information you collect during your job search.”  She also mentioned another tool to “manage and organize business cards you collect,” which JibberJobber does nicely, and a different tool to “create an automatic follow-up system,” which JibberJobber also does.

Yes, we really are that amazing. 

Enough about us, though. I want to reciprocate the kind shout-out and tell you about Anna.  She created  the “Love Your Career Formula,” which is a formula we could all use.  Tonight she is doing a free webinar called “How to Ditch Your Dead End Job and Find a Career You Love.”

The good thing about most JibberJobber users is that they have already “ditched” their job…. so that part is taken care of :)   And they are intensely focused on finding a career… let’s join the webinar tonight to make sure we are doing the right things so the career we are chasing is one we’ll love!

Sign up here…

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How To: Get Started on JibberJobber

October 8th, 2014

A frequently asked question from newbies is how do I get started?  What do I do first?  Then what do I do?

This is kind of a hard question to answer because it kind of depends on how you work, what you are trying to accomplish, etc.  But let me take the question 10,000 feet up and assume that I’m advising my mom (hi mom!) on how to get started using JibberJobber.  Let’s say my mom just got laid off and is looking for a new job.  What should she do first on JibberJobber?

There really isn’t a first thing to do… there are a few first things to do (yes, I numbered them all #1 on purpose):

1. DO NOT get overwhelmed.  This is a mental thing… but the first thing I want you to think about is that you can do this.  Look, the job search is a complex thing.  You have to organize and manage A LOT of information and data.  Who you meet, their contact info, what you talked about, when you need to follow-up.  What your target companies are, who works there, what version of which resume did you share with who, and when you need to follow-up (and with who, and how).  What jobs you are interested in, when you applied to what jobs, how did you apply, how do you follow-up, are you networking into that company, etc.  I this was simply a linear, logical process, it could be easier to manage, BUT we’re dealing with human beings here.  There is not right way to do anything (like interview) that works every single time, in every company, in every industry, for every job.  You have to be totally on top of your game.  Having said that, JibberJobber can help you with a lot of this complexity.  Instead of feeling like you are drowning in information, and overwhelmed with complexity, use JibberJobber to help organize and manage.  One of my earliest users and evangelists said “JibberJobber is my virtual assistant.”  I love that he thought of it that way – let it help you not feel overwhelmed.

Further, there is a lot you can do in JibberJobber, but as you get started I want you to not worry about what you can do, but focus on what you should do.  In general, your job search should be about networking and follow-up (and of course, a lot more, but that is a critical part of your job search strategy).  Start there.  You can ignore the other features until you are ready for them.

1. Think of JibberJobber as a long-term career management tool.  You will collect a lot of information, or as I like to call it, “intelligence,” in your job search.  Names, numbers, email addresses, who works where, who interviewed you, who you liked and who was a complete jerk, what you talked about, when you followed-up, etc. Can you imagine collecting all of this important information and then throwing it away?  I have heard from too many job seekers who have found their dream job and within months, or usually a few years, found themselves in transition again. The new “career management” is to change jobs regularly… please, please, please don’t treat your time on JibberJobber, and the data you collect, as a temporary band-aid solution.  What you do here, now, should help you for the duration of your career!

1. Sign up for the JibberJobber Orientation.  We do these almost every Wednesday. Sign-up here. If you can’t attend a live one, schedule ten minutes a day and watch a recording in parts. Speaking of ten minutes, we do a “Focus Friday” each Friday where we (a) focus on one feature/topic for just ten minutes, and (b) stay on and answer your questions.  You can sign up once and then just attend the Focus Friday webinars you can.

1. Import contacts from LinkedIn, Outlook, Gmail, etc.  A lot of people like to come into JibberJobber and see contacts there. LinkedIn doesn’t make it super easy to export contacts (here’s how you do it), but you usually get contacts out of your other systems into a csv format.  You can then import those into JibberJobber.  You can also SYNC your contacts between JibberJobber and Gmail, which allows you to put your JibberJobber Contacts onto your phone in the phone’s native contacts app.  I’m not going to say this is a critical “getting started” step, but a lot of people want to do it (which is fine).

1. Set up your Email2Log and use it right now.  This is easily the coolest, most powerful feature in JibberJobber, and I use it multiple times every day.  The concept is this: when you send an email, put a special and unique-to-you email2log email address in the BCC field.  The email will go to JibberJobber where we will (a) create new contacts, if the other recipients are not already your contacts in JibberJobber, and (b) it will take your email and make it a Log Entry. This is SO VERY powerful and cool, and it easily saves me 30+ minutes a day from doing all this administrative stuff by hand.

1. Enter a new Contact, Company and Job. You can enter them in any order… it doesn’t matter which you enter first.  Put in a recruiter with only the information that really matters (does a fax, or street address really matter?  Probably not.).   Put in a job the recruiter sent to you (or one you found on Indeed).  Enter a contact, even if it is just you.  This is easy stuff, but it’s the core of JibberJobber, and you’ll likely be doing this a fair amount over the next few weeks.

1. Create a Log Entry and Action Item.  Once you have a Contact, Company or Job in JibberJobber, go to the Detail Page of that record and create a Log Entry.  For example: “I had lunch with Jason today. We talked about xyz, I need to follow-up on abc.”  Then, click the Action Item link and put a date to follow-up. This is another core feature in JibberJobber, and should help you keep things from slipping through the cracks.  Your job search, and career management, is about “nurturing relationships” and “follow-up” and this is how you manage that.

There is more you can do.  This is probably just 10% of the functionality… but this is the GETTING STARTED advice I would give my mom.  Pretty simple, right?

Really, make sure you get on an orientation webinar, and please do not hesitate to ask us for help.  When you ask us for help, you help us understand where people are getting stuck, which can help many other people!

 

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How to Block People on LinkedIn

October 6th, 2014

On Facebook my colleague and well-respected career expert Susan Whitcomb asked if there was a way to block people from seeing updates in LinkedIn.  The typical scenerio is that someone starts a job search, and wants to NOT broadcast that to their network.  They might update their resume, post an “update” on the homepage, participate in groups, etc…. how do you block individuals from seeing what you are doing?

The short answer is, YOU CANNOT.

This question about privacy reminds me of my IT security professor back in the 90′s who said that if you want or expect any privacy, UNPLUG your computer from the internet.  Period.

You really shouldn’t have any assumption or expectation of privacy online, ever.

In LinkedIn, there aren’t any foolproof ways to shut people out of what you are doing.  In fact, you can’t even do that in Facebook.

Let me give you an example. Facebook has more refined personal privacy options than LinkedIn does, partially because of what Facebook is for and what LinkedIn is for.  Anyway, even with the very tight privacy settings in Facebook, it’s possible to *think* you are ranting privately, and you kind of are.  But what if one of your “friends” shares your rant with someone you mutually know, who you have blocked?

The rant isn’t so private anymore, is it?

What if they take a screenshot of your rant and post it on a blog?

Not private at all, huh?

You can have all the locks in place, but as long as humans are involved, there is potential for social engineering, which means that your update you thought was private is now shared in the lunchroom and boardrooms of your current company.

OOPS.

Are there security options in LinkedIn to block?  Kind of.

Should you trust them?  Only if… well, actually, NO.  NEVER.

But what if you aren’t connected with anyone at your company?

Um… let me explain how LinkedIn works: it doesn’t matter!

They can go to LinkedIn and still see some (most) of your stuff.  They can also do a search on Google and find some (most) of your stuff.  LinkedIn, by it’s nature, is a place to find and be found, to be visible, to share your brand, experience, etc.  It’s not a place to hide stuff.  That’s what a diary is for (you know, the book you write stuff in, and it’s not connected to the Internet!?).

Like I said, there are some technical privacy tools in place, kind of … BUT none of those matter as long as ANYONE in your network might share what you posted with their contacts… who just might be your boss you are trying to hide from.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

What Are Your Guiding Principles?

October 3rd, 2014

david_safeer_headshotI get David Safeer’s newsletters, and this was had an idea that was too good to not share. David is a management and leadership consultant – read about him on the front page of his site.  He’s done a very nice job communicating who he is and why he is relevant to his right audience.

In his most recent newsletter he shares his “business principles,” which are business principles “to achieve outstanding performance.”  It made me wonder, what are my business (or life, or marriage, or father, or entrepreneur, or CEO, or product manager, etc.) principles?

He says he wrote these almost ten years ago, and that reviewing them now, there are NO changes to make.  To me that indicates they are indeed principles instead of tactics, which can and usually should change over time.  Go check out his list – it really reads like a short book on how to do better in business.

As I read his list I had three thoughts:

  1. His list is about people and relationships, not about numbers.  He says: “I am convinced that people are THE key to a successful organization, so my thoughts about business principles turn often to the people side of things.”  Where do your thoughts about your principles turn?
  2. Can you create your own list of principles?  This could be like a personal business plan, or map, that helps you make decisions and be true to yourself.  What would be on your list?
  3. Once you have a list, this is a great way for you to stay relevant. How?  Read on…

Being relevant is an interesting concept.  When I started JibberJobber I thought people would talk about me and JibberJobber for a long time. I got interest and buzz at first, but then things died down, and I found I had to continually put something interesting and/or new in front of people.  I wrote a book on LinkedIn, and that did it (for a while).  But then 40 other people wrote books on LinkedIn, and I wasn’t THE expert anymore. I was losing relevance.  I had to do other things, which I did. I still do other things to stay in front of people and try to stay relevant.

Why do you think LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook make so many changes to their systems? Some are good and needed, others are simply to get press.

When David put his guiding principles in front of me, he shot back up to “relevant.”

Think about this for YOU.  What can you do to remain relevant with your audience?

Don’t get me wrong, this is not just a branding/networking thing. I think having guiding principles is AWESOME.  I encourage you to work on your own.  And, use what you come up with as a reason to get back in front of your network contacts and create a bit of buzz or conversation.

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

New JibberJobber User Orientation Videos Are Up

October 2nd, 2014

I just updated the JibberJobber User Orientation Videos in the Video Library - click here to watch them.

Remember, to make the videos full-screen, scroll to the bottom and right of the box the video is in and then click the full-screen icon (the middle arrow is pointing to it):

jj_videos_full_size

If you want to catch a live orientation, or get on the Focus Friday’s calls, sign up from this page.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

An Interview with Jeff Browning (Austin Ventures) and Liz Handlin (Ultimate Resumes)

October 1st, 2014

I get Liz Handlin’s newsletter.  She gave me permission to post this from her newsletter… I thought it was interesting. Liz says these are her questions and his answers over coffee (learn more about Jeff Browning here):

Do you read profiles on resumes?No. Most of them are not useful to me. I want to know about specific domain experience, scope of job, and your accomplishments. Metrics matter. Add metrics to your resume.  I also want to see some information about your employers because I haven’t heard of every company in the world. What does the company do? How large is it? Is it public or private?

When someone sends you a resume how long do you look at it to determine if you are interested in reading more of it?

About 5 seconds.

What are you looking for in resumes that are submitted to Austin Ventures for jobs in your portfolio companies?

Well first you have to understand that most of our job descriptions are VERY granular and specific.  Domain (industry) experience is the most important thing I look for so if you don’t have the domain experience we are looking for at the moment you may not be a fit for the immediate need we have, but could be at a later time.

We also look for individuals who have actually worked in early-stage start ups before. We want someone has seen this movie before and knows how it goes because we need our executives to be able to hit the ground running.  If you have never worked in an early stage start up before you just don’t know what you don’t know. Individuals who have spent an entire career in large corporations sometimes think they could easily make the jump to early stage start-ups but it’s just not usually the case.

Do you think that someone who has spent their entire career in Fortune 500 companies could be successful at an early-stage start up?

Well anything is possible and large company executives have many talents and valuable experiences. It also depends on the stage of the company. But, generally speaking, we find that executives who are the most successful in leading start-ups have previously been employed by other start-up companies.

What advice do you have for big-company executives who want to switch gears and work in a start-up environment?

If you are an executive at a large company like, say, IBM, and you want to work in an early-stage start-up, my advice is to take it in steps.  The analogy I use is diving. You learn to snorkel first and then you slowly learn to dive deeper and deeper.  The same can be said of the start-up world. If you are a big-company executive you might try transitioning to a mid-sized company before diving into the world of early-stage companies.  Start ups and large corporations are totally different professional experiences.

What DON’T you want to see in a resume?

I don’t like to read functional resumes because they are confusing.  I want the resume to be simple, straightforward, and to the point.  No graphs. No charts. No hard-to-find dates or metrics.  Think about how to make the resume easy for me to get the information I need to decide whether or not to call you. Don’t make it confusing or colorful because it’s distracting and I don’t have time to try to decipher confusing resumes.

What surprises you about the job seekers to whom you talk?

I am surprised at how many people contact me about jobs and when I tell them that I don’t have a position for them currently and don’t really have any ideas for them about job openings they have no other questions for me. They don’t ask me about the Austin marketplace which I know well. They don’t come prepared with questions other than “do you know of any job openings.”  I enjoy executives that have done their homework and come prepared with thoughtful questions.  It’s also really nice when they end the conversation with “is there anything I can do to help you?”

Liz says “Jeff may see more resumes than any other recruiter in Texas so his perspective on what a resume should say and how it should look is crucial information for job seekers.”

Thanks for sharing Liz and Jeff!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

JibberJobber vs. “Endlessly Confused”

September 30th, 2014

I got a very nice note from a new user a couple of weeks ago, and she said we could share what she wrote:

You are amazing! Years of working locums leaves me endlessly confused. I have been bombarded with recruiter email/spam so often I had to create a separate junk mail account. I would forget who offered which job and the details. I have only been using your site for 2 weeks and I am loving it. Thank you so much. My recruiters thank you.
D. Gasque

I had to look up locums… it is a word I hadn’t heard before. But really, she had me at “you are amazing!” :)

We love feedback, and this kind of feedback puts a smile on our faces… thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts D.!  And you can tell your recruiters “you’re welcome!”

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How Do You Print Reports for the Unemployment Office?

September 29th, 2014

I just got this question from a user:

How do I print out a list of the jobs I have entered?  I have a meeting with the unemployment office and they are requiring me to bring my records on paper.  Go figure.

Go figure, for sure :)

This is pretty easy to do.  The report you can get to by following the instructions below can be used for UI claims as well as to send to an accountability partner (aka, coach).

Step 1: Get to the Log Entries and Action Items Report.  You can do this by clicking on the word Logs (from the main menu) or mouse over Reports and click on the link:

log_entry_action_item_report

Step 2: Check what is displaying in the blue box.  By default we show you everything, but we remember any customizations you make.  I’m guessing you’ll want to change what is showing… just click the “Change” link to filter down what you want to see (and print out):

log_entry_action_item_report_included

Step 3: Yeah, I knew you would want to change something.  At the very least you will likely want to narrow down the date range that you show – you don’t want to print everything… right?  You can filter this down very nicely (like, check the Jobs box and uncheck the other four):

log_entry_action_item_report_configure

Step 4: Click to print.  Once you click Change, and you see the filtered results, click on the Actions button and from the dropdown, click Print Log Entries and Action Items.  This will bring up the print dialog, and you should know what to do from there :)

log_entry_action_item_report_print

This is a great report!

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Venture Capitalists Are Like Job Seekers: Looking, Networking, Following-Up

September 24th, 2014

And guess what they use to do all of that?

A relationship management tool. Not JibberJobber, because JibberJobber is not optimized for what they need to do (many people in the office accessing records, people “owning” a contact, or even one conversation, etc.).

And job seekers shouldn’t use a normal CRM because it is not optimized for a job seeker.  It’s probably 80 to 90% good enough, but there are things that job seekers need to do that CRM doesn’t address.  And most job seekers don’t need the sales pipeline stuff that is forefront of most CRM tools.

My point is, though, that if you want to WIN, and crush the competition (well, VCs want to do that, I’m not saying you want to CRUSH anyone), you need to be more serious and purposeful about your networking, tracking, follow-up, etc.

This article is a fun and exciting read: How Andreessen Horowitz Is Disrupting Silicon Valley

Check out this part, under the subtitle: It’s all about the ecosystem

What differentiates Andreessen Horowitz is something else, something very different than Kleiner, Sequoia, Benchmark, or Accel have done. Using customer relationship management software as a foundation, Andreessen Horowitz seems to be creating one of the largest, most networked, and powerful ecosystem platforms in the world. It is an astonishingly simple idea that yet is disrupting old power on Sand Hill Road and in Silicon Valley venture capital.

Manage relationships.  MANAGE RELATIONSHIPS!  It is an astonishingly simple idea, isn’t it?  Job seekers do it on the band-aid called Excel… which eventually gets ripped off and thrown away (and all of that great information is lost!).

I want to empower YOU to disrupt your job search by using this astonishingly simple idea, which is handed to you on a silver platter called JibberJobber.

Are you serious about your job search?

Are you serious about your career?

Then get serious about JibberJobber, which is the tool to use from now until the end of your career, to help you manage relationships.

Read the article for more inspiration… and get on a webinar to learn how to use JibberJobber better.  It is time!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Email Addresses: The Unintended Personal Branding Message

September 23rd, 2014

Yesterday I wrote about email addresses, and how they might be branding you.

The most popular email address people use to sign up for JibberJobber is Gmail. It is clearly the leader, as far as the people who are attracted to a more sophisticated job search / relationship tool.  Juno is not popular anymore, although every once in a while I get someone who signs up with a Juno account.

Let me share some advice with regard to your email service provider, other than the branding issue that we talked about yesterday.

Get an email address that you can always “own.”  I hate seeing people sign up with certain email addresses.  For example, if you are getting laid off, WHY IN THE WORLD are you signing up for JibberJobber with your soon-to-be old work email address?  In a few weeks or months you won’t have access to that account, which will make things like password retrieval a headache.  Worse, someone at your old company might be able to hijack your account… if they have control over your old work email, they can “request password” from any site that has your email on it, change the password, and you’ve just lost it.

Don’t use your ISP’s email address. Another thing that makes me cringe is seeing people sign up with a Comcast or some other ISP. Why?  Because ISPs come and go. Maybe yours has been around forever, but what if YOU come and go?  You know how easy it is to switch to another ISP.  What if, one day, you decide to dump your ISP?  Then what happens to your email?  You’ll have to send out the famous/notorious “my email has changed…”  This could have been avoided if you got a Gmail or outlook (or other like email) address.

Okay, so privacy is kind of an issue.  It shouldn’t be, though. If you use Gmail, you should know you don’t have much privacy.  Do you want Google to tap into your private life, or do you want the NSA to tap into it?  At least both organizations have different objectives.  What some people do is use all of Gmail’s products (search, images, maps, etc.) and a different company’s email (like outlook.com), just so Gmail doesn’t have 100% of your information and browsing curiosities.  I don’t do that, but I know a lot of people do.

So there you go – a few thoughts about email issues.  Good luck!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

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