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Sandwich Board Guy On CNN Got JibberJobber Help

December 16th, 2008

A while back I met Paloma, who was here in Utah for a while and had gotten involved as a volunteer at a church-sponsored employment “agency.”  Paloma heard about JibberJobber and wanted to meet me, so my family had dinner with her and her husband and a friendship began.

Paloma and her husband came to Utah on a lucrative contract that fell apart shortly after they arrived. They found themselves as clients at the employment agency, and then volunteers helping others.  Paloma has a big heart, and a big desire to help others, and is a very smart person.

Eventually, her husband’s job search took them to Maryland.  Paloma has evangelized JibberJobber and reached out to Joshua Persky (his LinkedIn profile), of NYC sandwich board fame, to see what we could do to help.

In Joshua Persky’s blog post he acknowledges Paloma’s help:

It’s been a fantastic first 2 days at Weiser LLP. Thank you again to my family, Paloma Bowland of www.jibberjobber.com, Richelle Konian of www.careersonthemove.com, and Elliot Ogulnick, Director of Business Valuation / Corporate Finance at Weiser LLP who hired me.

Pretty cool!  Of course, it would be cooler if he said “JibberJobber was so indispensible in my job search, I don’t know what I would have done without it!” or “the only reason I landed this dream job was because I a sandwich board on my chest and JibberJobber on my computer!” or “I owe JibberJobber everything, as it was the real key to going from unemployed to dream job!”

Oh well :)  It’s supercool that Paloma had a lot to do with helping Joshua land! Here are some online stories about Joshua Persky:

Joshua Persky gets hired: What’s the craziest thing you’ve done to get a job?

Joshua Persky: desperate and alone (Wallstrip)

Joshua Persky (on Mahalo)

BETTER SIGN OF TIMES – FROM SANDWICH BOARD TO DREAM JOB

I hear this stuff works… notice in the picture… A SMILE!

Congrats Joshua!

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LinkedIn and Facebook Webinar on Wednesday

December 15th, 2008

Netshare has invited me back to do a follow-up webinar on using LinkedIn (and now Facebook) for executives and professionals in a job search (or, in career management).  This event is also sponsored by Career Resumes, a JibberJobber Partner.

Wednesday afternoon at 4pm EST I will start a 90 minute webinar for Experts Connection (cost is $50).  I’m really excited about this webinar because I’m taking stuff I’ve learned from about 60 presentations this year and creating a powerful presentation for this audience.

Here is more information:

LinkedIn & Facebook Essentials for Executives: Using Both Platforms as Professional Networking Tools
Guest Speaker: Jason Alba, Founder and CEO of JibberJobber.com & author of I’m on LinkedIn – Now What??? andI’m on Facebook – Now What???

Date: Wednesday, December 17, 2008
Time: 4:00-5:30 PM Eastern, 1:00-2:30 PM Pacific

Class Description: LinkedIn is the professional network recruiters and hiring managers use to find talent. As important, it is the social network other professionals and executives use to find partners, customers and business relationships. It is not a hotbed of job seekers…rather…decision makers. If you are not using LinkedIn, you are missing out on a viable way to optimize opportunities that are available. This presentation is designed for executives…to help you understand ways to optimize LinkedIn. We’ll cover a number of tactics you can implement immediately to grow your network, nurture individual relationships, while putting your professional brand in front of your immediate and extended network.

Facebook is regarded as a popular hangout for a younger crowd…but that crowd has grown up and started in hiring manager and influencer roles. We’ll explore techniques you can implement on Facebook to network, share your brand and communicate with other professionals.

In this 90 minute session you will learn:

  • How to create your LinkedIn profile to increase odds of being found.
  • How to best communicate with your LinkedIn network.
  • How to use the LinkedIn search features for an executive job search.
  • How to use LinkedIn “Answers” as a strategy to enhance your personal brand.
  • How to use new LinkedIn features to communicate with network contacts and professionals who should know you.
  • The best way to get the “right” recommendations on your LinkedIn profile.
  • How to create a compelling Facebook profile.
  • Two techniques to find professionals in your field on Facebook.
  • Elements of a connection strategy for both platforms.

Hope you can make it!

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Understanding Job Boards

December 12th, 2008

Job boards are so simple they are confusing.  What exactly are we supposed to do with them?  Some say we should ignore them completely, although I don’t think that’s a good idea.

After reading Cheezhead’s blog post titled ax falling hard at careerbuilder, and the 175+ mostly irate comments, I thought I’d take a stab at the topic.  Perhaps I’m wrong… you can tell me in the comments.

I think job boards are great resources to do “competitive intelligence research.”

Job boards, from what I’ve been able to assess, don’t care about the job seeker.  You are a number, a commodity, and once you get your job you go away.

The only reason they want you to come is so they can sell your eyeballs to their advertisers, typically companies who are interested in posting job postings (aka, job ads).  I’d imagine they tell companies they have x,000,000,000 visitors who spend y:yy time on their site, and go to z# of pages.

And HR says “oh, that is a very big market for us, so we will pay you all kinds of money for job postings!

Yeah, I’m generalizing. I think one of the very best job boards out there, which doesn’t even look like a job board, is idealist.org, which is where you should be if you are into humanitarian or “save the world” stuff… you know, if you are an Idealist (not to be confused with “idea list”).  Another impressive job board is CollegeRecruiter.com, for the amount of value-add information and the way they engage their various audiences.

But other job boards just don’t get (or care about) YOU, the job seeker.  It’s all about making money from a hiring company.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that, of course… all businesses are in business to make money (even non-profits).

But the job seeker doesn’t pay… it’s the company that pays (for the job posting).

So CareerBuilder is supposedly trying to have good-looking financials to end the year, and Monster is supposedly going to roll out new stuff in an industry-changing upgrade in January (I’m not holding my breath – if it’s a social networking component for job seekers I’ll shake my head for everyone watching).

Where does that leave you, the job seeker or career manager?  Use job boards for the tool they are, and don’t spend much time on them (best to set up the email alerts and then move on to other activities).

Just like with a recruiter… you are not the recruiter’s client, the company is.  Any recruiter who helps you out may be going above-and-beyond, but it’s not their duty to help you.

Thoughts?

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Generation V (and generational war thoughts)

December 11th, 2008

I saw a tweet from Scott Ingram that caught my attention, where he asks about General V:

I’ve read a number of comments on Penelope Trunk’s blog about generation Y vs. the baby boomers, and of course my generation, the forgotten generation, Gen X.

There’s a lot of animosity, and blame.  I see the millennials (GenY) blame the Baby Boomers for this financial mess (recession) we are in, while the baby boomers are saying “we’ve worked for what we got, and why did you go into debt to get a big screen TV?? Something we didn’t do… and on and on.

If you want to get your generational thang riled up go read the comments from Reason to give thanks: There is no job shortage for young people and 3 Ways work will change when Gen Y is in charge.

As my wife would say, it’s enough to “make my tired ache.”

Every generation has their strengths and weaknesses.  And all younger generations, including those to come, think that the older generations are a bunch of know-nothing has-beens.

I think it’s hilarous to generalize that all young people know technology and all old people don’t … I find that to be untrue, especially in the workplace.

I am still amazed to ask a room full of college students who is on LinkedIn (hardly anyone) and who is on facebook (hardly anyone).

The stereotypes just don’t seem to be true, as with most stereotypes.

Can’t we all just get along??

That’s where this Generation V thing might come in… and if it isn’t Generation V, perhaps there is something that will help us step out of the hurtful stereotypes.

You can read more about Generation V at:

And here are a few recent posts from this blog about Age Discrimination

What does all of this mean for YOUR career?

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Social Networks for the Job Search

December 10th, 2008

Frequently I’m asked what social networks people should join. I have my (very cool) answer, which is more of a thought process to help YOU figure out which networks YOU should join… and I recently found a terrific analysis of a bunch of social networks.

Thanks to Susan Joyce, of Job-Hunt.org, who forwarded me a link to the Ignite “2008 Social Network Analysis Report,” which shares geographic and demographic information as well as traffic information about about 42 social networks… this report is tremendous, and should be helpful in determining which social networks you, as a job seeker or career manager, should consider joining.

After checking out the report, here are some questions I’d ask myself:

  • Which networks are getting enough traffic/users that merit my involvement? In other words, is there enough traction for me to be involved?
  • Which networks are getting traffic/users from the countries you need to network with? If you deal with south america you should join _____, if you deal with Asia you should join _____, etc.
  • Which networks have users that are making the right amount? Don’t care to network with a bunch of kids with no income?  Check the stats to see which ones to avoid.  I’ll caution you, though, be aware of the “country” + “income” conflict… in other words, there might be a lot of users in your target country who seem to not make much, but in that (those) countries it might be a lot.

Thanks Susan Joyce, this is the best resource I’ve seen (that I can remember) to evaluate which networks are worth my time!

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LinkedIn! LinkedIn! LinkedIn!

December 9th, 2008

If you are a professional, being on LinkedIn is NOT an option.  Facebook is optional. Twitter is optional. A blog is optional.  Yahoo! Groups are optional.

LinkedIn is not optional.

With that in mind, there are three things you need to know about:

The second edition of my LinkedIn book is shipping, even from Amazon.

It’s been a long time coming!  I wrote a post on my LinkedIn blog yesterday with all kinds of juicy information, INCLUDING information about how to get a FREE LinkedIn eBook!  How, you ask?  If you purchased the book from Happy About you will (or already have) receive a link to download the second edition, for free!  If you purchased the book through Amazon please go to the blog post from yesterday and follow the instructions, and we’ll get back to you with what to do to get the second edition LinkedIn eBook for free (it’s simple).  The cost is free for the eBook if you purchased the first edition, OR 11.95 for the second edition LinkedIn ebook, or 19.95+S&H for the LinkedIn paperback (or whatever Amazon charges).

Tomorrow you have the chance to learn from THE most connected person on LinkedIn.

Ron Bates is the man!  He has the largest first degree network on LinkedIn, and anyone who has a ton of connections and wants to grow their network knows who Ron is (the guy to beat :p).  Ron is offering a free webinar tomorrow, 12/10 – here’s the link to register, and here are some details (there is no cost):

If you are not able to attend the complimentary events coming up make sure to register anyway!!  Even if you’re traveling, in a meeting, or unplanned events cause you to miss the webinar, as a – no-show – you’ll receive a follow-up email with a link to access a recording at your convenience.

Do people really know how good you are??
December 10, 2008 (1pm EST) – How to Communicate Your Executive Value Proposition
Presented by Ron Bates – LinkedIn’s most connected member with over +44,000 direct contacts

Next week, Dec 17th, I will do a webinar for Experts Connection called LinkedIn & Facebook Essentials for Executives: Using Both Platforms as Professional Networking Tools.

I did a LinkedIn for Executives a month or two ago and it went really well – next week we are doing another one, and I’m really excited about this one.  Sponsored by Netshare and Career-Resumes (who does LinkedIn makeovers for $200), this is one of the most exciting presentations I’m doing this year – Netshare always puts on awesome events).  The cost for the 90 minute webinar is $50 (click here to learn more).

You better be on LinkedIn.

And you better have a LinkedIn strategy.

Do you?


Find your next job at Job Search USA.

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I Used JibberJobber In A Cool Way!

December 8th, 2008

I’m pretty excited about this… we’ve had this premium feature in JibberJobber for a while, and I have known it’s useful, but this morning I used it in a way so cool (and simple) I had to share :)

I was writing an introduction from a software specialist to three guys I know at a super-cool IT recruiting shop in the Salt Lake area.  My first thought was to search all their names, and then get their email addresses so I could include all three guys in the introduction.

Then I thought “I’ll just search the company name from the List Panel” and then I could drill down on their accounts to get their email addys (I don’t show the email addy on my List Panel view – you can but I choose to see it from the Manage Columns link). So I put this into the search box for my network contacts:

The search results show up (just five records) and I simply click on the multi-action icon () to get all the email addresses in a format I can just copy and paste… I selected the three contacts and then click on the last icon (red arrow)… like this:

Then I get their email addyresses in the box below… notice #1 shows that I can just click to create a new email message with their addresses already in it, AND we are giving you the box so you can simply copy and paste into an existing message (#2):

Back on the List Panel, I clicked on the add log entry icon () and added a log entry to all three records, noting the introduction email I sent out.  I like to log things like that so I can remember my activity with my contacts… how cool is that??

Like I said, it’s been in the system for a while, but it was SO cool to use it this way… if you need email addy’s of a group of people, and you can somehow define the group (by company, or by name (a family name), or by tags, categories or keywords, then you can use this feature… COOL :)  (again, it’s a premium feature… so if you don’t see it, upgrade).

Yeah, it’s the simple things in life (and JibberJobber) that please me :p

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Living Givers Gain With Your Professional Contacts

December 5th, 2008

I first remember hearing the phrase Givers Gain from Scott Allen, author of The Virtual Handshake.

The concept made sense, as all good networkers should be giving, giving, giving, right?

I checked for a good definition of Giver’s Gain in wikipedia… their definition stinks.  I like what I found on the Duct Tape blog:

If you give business to another professional, you will get business from them.

It’s as simple as that.  If you GIVE, you will (or, I say, MAY) GET.

I think there are a number of factors here:

  • You should GIVE regularly. Not just once, and wait for it to pay off…
  • You should GIVE smartly. Don’t open your blackbook to anyone who comes along, don’t pass along referrals to people who you really don’t know, be careful who you are giving to, but once you have that confidence, give a lot.
  • You should GIVE without expecting/demanding anything in return. This is a tricky one… here are some thoughts:
    • DO NOT keep score or hold grudges. Many people just don’t “get it” and once they GET from you, they move on. Not because they are buttheads, but because they don’t know any better.
    • Know what you might ask for in return, or how the favor could be repaid. When someone says “Jason, how can I help you?” you really need to have a good response, with a way they could help.  Sometimes is stuff that they specifically could do, based on their position, power or relationships, and sometimes you just respond with a “shoot for the stars” goal that you don’t know if they could help with or not.
    • Be ready to accept their help, and act on it.  Have you ever offered someone help and they did nothing with it?  Like an email introduction that no one responded to?  It’s frustrating, right?  If they do help you, no matter how small, respond and express gratitude.  There may be more to come (if the trust level can build).

In my job search I remember an interview at one of my target companies.  I really, really wanted to work for this company, as they are the 800lb guerrilla in their space, the space was sexy, and I knew I could contribute and learn a lot.

During the interview all I could think about was a guy who I had met earlier in networking meetings.  The job was cool for me, but this guy was the right guy for the job.

I could have pursued the job, and I learned later that they pretty much decided on me (it was mine to take), but instead I told the interviewer that he really had to interview this other guy.  We could talk after they interviewed the other guy.

Long story short, this other guy got the job offer, and I was thrilled.  Not because I didn’t get the job, but because (a) the company got the right hire, and (b) I played a very small part in helping this dude, and his family, get back on their feet.

I’ve never heard back from him… not even a thanks… nothing.  I don’t really care.  I consider that one of those “he didn’t get it” things, but I know I did the right thing and it makes me happy to have given.

Will I GET from him?  Probably not.  But I believe in Giver’s Gain, and “what goes around comes around,” and as long as i keep giving I’m going to get more than I know what to do with.

Have you had any (positive or negative) experiences with Giver’s Gain?

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What To Do With Your JibberJobber Account When You Land Your Job?

December 4th, 2008

I love testimonials… I really got a kick out of this one, from a senior level marketing executive:

You told me two years ago how beneficial it will be to have all your job searching info archived some place where you can find it, dust it off and use it again at a later date.

Well, here I am, at a later date and when I returned to JibberJobber it was like returning home to a familiar and friendly “happy place”.

Don’t let this imply that being without a job two years ago was anything like a happy place but now that I’m at the doorstep of going through that process again, the info, processes, support, etc. resident on Jibberjobber made it feel like a friendly and welcome “happy place”.

I want to share with all your readers that it’s true…JibberJobber is a great place to safely keep your career growth info.  It’s like keeping a map or atlas in your jockey box (aka, glove compartment).  You only need it when you’re lost but it’s sure nice to have it when you need it…

This is from an executive who knew me during my job search.  I emphasized that we would supposedly be in transition every three to five years, according to Uncle Sam.  I am a firm believer in using JibberJobber even when you are employed, since you still should be networking, but the point above is this:

Even if you don’t use it during the time you are employed, how powerful is it to be able to:

(a) come back, years later, and tap into all the intelligence you collected in your last job search(es).  Phone numbers, names, email addresses, companies, etc.  Instead of starting your job search from Square 1, you are able to start from where you last left off, and

(b) have a set of tools already to go.  You don’t need to waste a week (or more) designing your job search spreadsheet, or trying to figure out what your old spreadsheet had in it (or looking for it)… you simply login to JibberJobber and it’s there, faithfully waiting for your return.

Thank you Mr. Executive (who requested to be anonymous), and best of luck in your new job search!

This post is brought to you by the JibberJobber One Thing.  Sign up to the One Thing to get ONE email sent to you each day with a suggestion of something you can do to move your career foreword (or at least not let it get stale).  You can see past One Thing emails at JibberJobber.com/onethingblog.

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JibberJobber Website Updates

December 3rd, 2008

It’s been TOO long since I’ve posted about updates to JibberJobber… we have had a number of releases since the last “what’s new” post, but they seemed to be kind of minor… but now that I’m going over this list I think it’s pretty cool stuff!

You can now associate Documents to Contacts and Companies. Previously you could just associate documents to job postings… doesn’t this make much more sense?

Degrees of Separation. When you add a new contact you can say who the person is “referred by.”  Aside from constructing the Tree View (where you can see your network graphically), you can now see the Degree of Separation on the contact’s detail page.

You can upload your own image on My Account. Down the road we have some very cool stuff coming out where YOU can share more stuff with other JibberJobber users… and to let them know more about you are are slowly making your account more into a profile.

Regular users have over a meg available for Documents… whatever we had before just wasn’t enough, even for the free folks.

We redesigned the main JibberJobber.com page. Enough about us, and how great we are, and more “let’s get down to business.”  Hope you don’t miss all the stuff we used to have there.

Users can  delete their own accounts. Letting your account sit idle for years is, in my opinion, much better than deleting your account… especially if you have entered any data.  Don’t ask me why, but it happens, and now it’s self-serve :)

On the List Panel, if you see the country column, you’ll see a flag of the country instead of the country name.  Simply cool.

“Regular expressions” in the search box. I thought I blogged about this before but check this out: you can do a search like this in the List Panel search box: “company:trugreen” … I’ll have another post about how this works, and what the keywords are.  Pretty powerful.

New multi-action on the Network List Panel. If you want to get the email addresses, formated to copy-and-paste into an email message, you can do that from the List Panel.

In the main search, if there is just one record, we automatically take you to that record saving you a click. Doesn’t sound like a big deal but it sure is cool to have it automatically go to the only record that matches.

Email reminders of birthdays coming up include the email address of the birthday boy (or girl). You used to get a message that said “Jason’s birthday is coming up!” … now it says Jason’s birthday is coming up (mm/dd/yyyy)…” so you don’t even have to login to JibberJobber to get necessary information to send an email to them.

Various minor bug fixes… we’d list them here but it doesn’t matter, just know we are constantly working on fixing this tool up for you!

We’re always interested in feedback – while we have a dev list a mile long, we want to know what you think, and what you want!

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