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Want to work as a recruiter? Read this…

February 28th, 2011

One of my users asked about a job as a tech recruiter so I pointed him over to a buddy of mine who is a … tech recruiter. ¬†My friend’s response was VERY interesting. I remember, in my job search, thinking that being a recruiter might be a fun and interesting job.

Consider this (slightly edited, and emphasis is mine):

Do you want to work for an agency? If so, I think __________ is hiring. _________ has a reputation for having an excellent training program as well. _________ and others are reasonable as well. _________ is one of the “boutique” agencies in the market right now and does top-notch work. Finally, you may want to talk with _______ at _______, a very good, high end tech shop. I can introduce you, if you wish.

Watch out for non-compete agreements, if you go with an agency. They are fairly standard, but be sure if you leave a company, you can still make a living… 6 month waiting period or 50 mile distance from your “home” recruiting area is what you should go for. 1yr max. More than that, and I would seriously think that company knows they will burn you out and not make you successful. Also, make sure their comp structure rewards you for performance and doesn’t cap out on you.

Good luck. It’s a crazy world out there.

Great advice… the lesson I learned from this is to ask for advice from people who are in the field you think you want to go into!

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One response to “Want to work as a recruiter? Read this…”

  1. thom singer says:

    Good advice on being wary of non-compete agreements. I think they serve a valid purpose (nobody should go through training, get access to clients, etc… and then steal their employers IP and lists, ….)….. but too often they are one sided.

    Any mutually-beneficial agreement should protect BOTH sides of the contract.

    Have a lawyer look at any non-compete and explain what it really means. I have seen many people get unfairly and overly penalized by one-sided agreements that limit their abilities to work following the end of employment.