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JibberJobber Job Search Widget (Chrome)

July 26th, 2017

Do you use Chrome to surf the internet? Check out our new JibberJobber Job Search Widget (version 1), which helps you grab information from the sites you visit and enter that information into JibberJobber (as a new Job, Contact, or Company record)!

jibberjobber_job_search_widget

Simply click the “ADD TO CHROME” blue button, and you’ll have your widget on the top of your browser, like this:

jibberjobber_job_search_widget_installed

Then, just go to any page and click the icon (NOTE: It will want you to login to the widget, even if you are logged in on the website. Not sure why… added security?) For example, I went to my LinkedIn page and clicked it and this is what I see:

jibberjobber_job_search_widget_contact

Notice the name and URL were pulled in… I can easily type anything else I want in the form on the right… and then scroll down to find the Save button.  If I want to copy and paste from the page, I have to select the text from the page and copy first, then click the widget icon to open this form. I’m not sure if that’s a widget limitation or not, but if we can, we’ll make that easier in the next version.

Here’s a job I grabbed from Indeed… I’m getting used to selecting and copying the description, and then hitting the widget icon, so I can paste the description into the right place:

jibberjobber_job_search_widget_job

Like I said, this is the first version… think Beta… we are already putting together a list of enhancements for the next version. If you have any suggestions to make this better for you, please let us know (here’s the Contact page).

 

 

 

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How To Organize Your Job Search / What Is JibberJobber

April 27th, 2017

This is the video that we are going to put on the front page of JibberJobber soon:

How to Organize Your Job Search (JibberJobber) from Jason Alba on Vimeo.

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Five Purposes of Resume

March 31st, 2017

jacqui-barrett-poindexter_headshotJacqui Barrett-Poindexter, Master Resume Writer, wrote a great post titled I disagree with career experts who claim the resume has just one purpose.

I have heard, and have probably written about, the one purpose for a resume: to get you into an interview.  But Jacqui’s post brings up some great points.  She says the five functions of a resume, in addition to getting interviews, are:

  1. Equips interview conversations.
  2. Focuses your career message and saves you time.
  3. Conveys your value to interview committee members.
  4. Supports professional reputation.
  5. Spurs deeper interview conversations.

Check out her post for deeper thoughts on each of those.

One of the most important things to understand about a resume is that the resume writing process is a process of self-discovery, understanding what value you bring to potential companies, framing your value proposition(s) in appropriate and compelling ways, and even gaining self-confidence that is grounded in fact.

If you didn’t get any of that from your resume writing experience, you might want to call a resume professional.

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Insider Information Video Library Preview: Ash Buckles

January 5th, 2017

Last month I introduced the new video library. This was my Big Announcement (read here).

I have been working on transcribing the Ask The Expert Interviews I did a few years back, and I finally have the FIRST Insider Information interview edited and transcribed.  Well, actually, it’s not as edited as I would have liked. There are a few sentences that I wish were edited out (where we talk about editing… how ironic). And, I was being attacked by a fly during most the the interview… and by the end you could see my patience had worn thin :)

Nonetheless, this is a great preview to what we’ll have in the video library. This interview is with a hiring manager and is only 34 minutes long.

Too long, you say? Yes, it is. But remember, you can search on keywords or topics, and we’ll highlight the certain parts of that interview that meet your search criteria just for you.

Over the course of this year I’ll add as many interviews as I can, with hiring managers, HR professionals, and recruiters.  I even have some interviews with ATS providers… so you can get a feel for what and how they think, and how that affects you.

To get a taste of what’s coming, check out the interview below, with Ash Buckles.  Ash shares a lot of good insight into the hiring process.  We learn what this hiring manager thinks about resumes, digital dirt, your presentation, how to talk about gaps in your work history, and more.

If you like where we are going with this, you can pay for access to the entire Insider Information Video Library (which includes my LinkedIn videos, and more).  The pricing is simple:

  • month to month: $9.95 a month (upgrade now)
  • one year: $99 (bonus: plus an extra 6 months, as we ramp up the content) (upgrade now)
  • BEST DEAL: one year, bundled with JibberJobber one year: $120 (bonus: plus an extra 6 months, as we ramp up the content) (upgrade now)
  • NOTE: If you are a career coach or outplacement firm, email me for special bulk pricing: Jason@JibberJobber.com

Here’s the interview with Ash… enjoy!

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How To: Avoid Duplicate Entry in JibberJobber

September 22nd, 2016

Recently a user said, about JibberJobber (or really, any CRM): “it just takes too much time – I can barely remember to copy JibberJobber…”

In other words, the user is saying he doesn’t like to put infomraiton somewhere, and then have to remember going into JibberJobber and putting it in there, too.  In the CRM world this is called “duplicate entry,” and it really is a pain.

That is why we created the Email2Log function, which is part of the premium features.  Here are two scenarios:

Yucky Scenario

Okay, this isn’t totally yucky… but it is the way that requires more work, and more thinking.  It’s the same thing you would do with any system… a spreadsheet, a CRM, a spiral notebook.

You send someone an email saying “nice to meet you, can we meet for lunch on Friday?”  After you send the email, you go into JibberJobber and see if the person has a Contact record. If they don’t, you add it, and then you add a Log Entry to that Contact record.

This is “no big deal,” except for the fact that it takes more work (it is duplicate entry, since you put info in your email, and then put info into JibberJobber).  Sometimes you’ll do the JibberJobber entry when you have time, which for me means never.  It’s just mental clutter that nags at you. Who needs that?

This way works, but there is another way…

Delightful Scenario

You send someone an email saying “nice to meet you, can we meet for lunch on Friday?”  This person is not in JibberJobber, but don’t worry… you don’t even have to open JibberJobber to add the information you want to add.

In your email to that person, simply put your Email2Log email address so that when you send the email to your new contact, it also goes to JibberJobber… where we parse your email and (a) create a new Contact record (if we can’t match the recipient to an existing contact), and (b) take the email and make it into a Log Entry on that record.

Better yet, if you have multiple recipients, it does the same for each one (if the recipient correlates to a Contact record, then put the Log Entry on the existing Contact record… and do not create a duplicate Contact record, OR, if there is no Contact record, then create a new one). If you have 20 recipients on an email, it will do all of this, automatically, for you!

Better yet, you can create Job records and Company records, and even Follow-up (or, Action Item) reminders, all from your email.

This is very powerful, and helps you focus on doing a job search, and not populating a database.

Here’s the Email2Log getting started tutorial:

Here’s the Email2Log advanced tutorial:

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JibberJobber Mobile Apps: Android and iOS (Apple)

June 21st, 2016

Liz asked me to let you know the mobile apps are available. I thought I did but I can see that I didn’t make a proper announcement… so…

THE JIBBERJOBBER MOBILE APPS ARE AVAILABLE!!!

Check out the JibberJobber mobile app page here.

JibberJobber for Android is here.

JibberJobber for iOS is here.

Please rate and review them, if you are in a good mood. If you are in a grumpy mood, well… be kind :p

What’s the plan with these mobile apps?  Just like we have updated and maintained the JibberJobber web tool for years and years, we’ll update and maintain the mobile apps.

The first update of the mobile apps is coming soon, based on lots of feedback from users.

Cost: free

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LinkedIn Summary vs. LinkedIn Experience Sections

March 29th, 2016

I got this question from Derek, who saw my LinkedIn Optimization course on Pluralsight (which you can get access to for free… read below):

“I just completed the course on LinkedIn Profile Optimization and feel that I have a strong above the fold profile which the video was mainly focused on.

The video didn’t focus on the experience section and what to write based off what you did at the company. You touched on writing mini stories for the summary and experience sections, I am not sure writing only mini stories will give the best overall picture in the experience section. Do you have another video on pluralsight that helps enhance the content for the experience section?”

This is a great question. After doing group trainings and one-on-one consultations for years, I feel like my “best answer” is jelling pretty good. Of course, there are exceptions, but in 99% of the one-on-one consultations I do, and the Profile critiques I’ve done, the answer below will be appropriate.

It’s critical to think about the LinkedIn Profile as one single marketing document.  If you break up the sections of the Profile, and think about them as a critical reader (recruiter, hiring manager, prospective funder, partner, prospect, customer, etc.) might, you could probably guess that some parts are more important than others.  For example, your Professional Headline is not only at the top, but it’s a part of your “mini profile,” and seen in other places on LinkedIn (other than your Profile page). On the other hand, the best way to contact me, or the seeking sections, are largely ignored (by design, because they are so far down the Profile).

If we think about the Profile as a single marketing document, the question is, what is the single message of the document?  I am now counseling my consultation customers to have that single message communicated in a concise and clean way in the Professional Headline.  This is what I call your “main claim,” or your primary claim.  Then, your Summary has five to seven secondary claims, ALL OF THEM SUPPORTING THE MAIN CLAIM.  These can be communicated in various ways, my favorite of which is the mini-stories.

You can see all of this in action in my LinkedIn Profile Optimization course on Pluralsight for free.  How?  JibberJobber users get a free 30 day pass to Pluralsight, which means you can watch this, and dozens of my other courses (including the LinkedIn Proactive Strategies course), during your 30 day window.  Click here to see how you can have access within a 60 seconds – no credit card required.

Okay, so in the Pluralsight course, it’s clear how to position the secondary claims and make your Summary much better than the status quo.  Derek gets that, but wonders what to do in the Experience section, which some people call the job description – the parts in each of the jobs you list in your Profile. This really isn’t a job description, although some people treat it that way. I suggest you make this more about YOU and less about the job.

How do you do that?

I think the best way is to use the exact same strategy as what you used in the Summary section. That is, secondary claims (that all support the primary claim in the Professional Headline), with mini-stories that (a) present the claim, (b) give a “for example,” and (c) quantify the results.

Mini-stories are SO powerful. When you align them with your primary claim, you give further evidence and support that your primary claim is valid, and that you are focused and understand your value.

What I normally see is resume-like statements that are super concise, and super dry and boring. Worse, they look cliche. They look like what anyone else would write that has your same job history, and is making the same claims, and is looking for the same job you are looking for.

Okay, you think, maybe that’s not so bad.  To be honest with you, having resume-speak on your Profile is better than the weak, non-information that I see on too many Profiles. So kudos for having anything that helps me understand you more.

But what I’d rather see you have in your “experience” sections are mini-stories that each (a) make a claim, (b) give me a meaty for-example, and (c) tell me why it matters (ie, the quantification)… this is what we accomplish with mini-stories, and (d) support the primary claim. This last part is important so the reader doesn’t get sidetracked by irrelevant information.

That’s my recommendation… from the summary all the way down through the Experience section… claims, quantification, and alignment.

Do you have a different idea? Leave a comment and let us know!

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How To Marry Excel and Word for Mass Letters

March 28th, 2016

I did this many, many moons ago. It takes a little bit of work, but not too much. If you want to send mass letters that look customized (based on the name of the recipient), here’s how you do it: How to use Microsoft Excel and Word to send multiple emails.

This post was written in 2009 by Walt Feigenson, a friend in the Silicon Valley area. We met when I was in town a few years back, speaking at some job clubs, and the last time I saw him was at his house for dinner (on a different trip).  The stories he has of the history of software, which he was involved with, are awesome.

And this merge technique, which might feel a little dated, is really quite powerful.  YMMV, based on editions of Word/Excel… if yours doesn’t work the way he describes, figure it out and let me know in the comments what is different :) (that is a tactful way of saying: I’m not tech support for this tactic – good luck :))

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6 Great Tech Tools for Job Seekers (from Recruiter.com)

March 24th, 2016

Recruiter.com included JibberJobber in their list of great tech tools for job seekers. Check out the paragraph or two on each of these tools at Next-Level Job Search: 6 Great Tech Tools for Job Seekers.

  1. LearnUp. Job skills training, career coaching, automatic interview scheduling for entry-level job seekers.
  2. Jobscan.co. Analyzes job descriptions and your resume to tell you how they stack up. Free for up to 5 matches, about $90/year for more. JibberJobber has some of this functionality (read here), but jobscan is very cool and more comprehensive then our version 1 attempt.
  3. Page Monitor. Tells you when something on a website has changed. Personally, I would suggest you forego checking page changes at this degree and just go out and network.
  4. SnapDat. Allows you to exchange contact info from one iphone to another. I can’t figure out how to find it in the store, though…
  5. Woo.io. Put together a wish list of your ideal job… and then they send you jobs/companies that match.  Very cool concept… I have never heard of them, though.
  6. JibberJobber. For obvious reason, this is a tech tool I can stand behind! :)

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How To Network Like a Veteran

March 23rd, 2016

Here’s a great post by Chad Storlie on Every Veteran Hired: 10 Steps to Networking Success: An Easy (and Effective) Strategy

You may not be military-trained, but that shouldn’t stop you from understanding and following the 10 steps. This is more than a cute article with some cute ideas… I strongly urge you to follow each of the steps, in order.

Except, of course, Step 5, which says to use a spreadsheet for your contacts. Obviously you would use JibberJobber.  You can start with a spreadsheet, but as you network more you’ll find the spreadsheet becomes a rats nest of information, and soon it becomes unusable.

Check it out!

 

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