JibberJobber: When to Use Log Entries vs. Tags

June 23rd, 2016

tracy_haas_corporate_trainer_atlantaHere’s a great question from Tracy Haas, a professional corporate trainer in Atlanta:

I am in the process of adding targeted companies and want to keep track of the requests to connect in LinkedIn so I don’t request it again, and to show what I action I have taken with that company. I was thinking of putting it in as a Log Entry… should I just do one and include all the names, or is it better to do a separate one for each individual (hope not as that would be extremely time consuming). Or is this even necessary in your opinion?

Also once I have connected with them, what is the easiest way to record my LinkedIn messages to them?

I’m going to share what I would do… you can determine if this is too much (or too little) for your needs.  Let’s go into each of the questions she has:

>> “and want to keep track of the requests to connect in LinkedIn (at each of her target companies)”  

This is a great idea… the fast and easy way to do this would be to create a Log Entry under the Company, and say who you invited to connected (or had any interaction with). Once you make contact with someone, though, with someone you think you will network with, I would create a new Contact record for that person.  Just make sure you associate that Contact with the Company (super easy to do).

For example, let’s say I invite Jane and John to connect on LinkedIn.  Both are from Acme Widgets. I would create a Log Entry under Acme Widgets saying “I invited John Doe and Jane Doe to connect on LinkedIn…. here was my message: __________________”.

John accepts my invitation to connect, but Jane doesn’t. I meet John in person… and start a professional relationship.  I’ll create a new Contact record for John, but no need to do that with Jane yet… until we start our relationship.  I could, but I have too many things happening to capture everything… and right now I’m okay to let Jane slide.

The reason I would do the Company Log Entry is because you said you want to “how what I action I have taken with that company.”

Note that most of my records are Contact records, not Company records… it’s probably 20 to 1, or more.

>> “should I just do one and include all the names, or is it better to do a separate one for each individual?” 

Do one Log Entry on the Company record… if you get to the point where it makes sense to do a separate one for each person, then just create a new Contact record for them.

>> “once I have connected with them, what is the easiest way to record my LinkedIn messages to them?”

First, my recommendation is to get OUT of LinkedIn messaging as soon as you can. I hate LinkedIn messaging for various reasons… it just doesn’t do the job, and it is one more place that I have to monitor. So, as soon as I can, I transfer the conversation to email or on the phone.

Having said that, if there is a relevant conversation in LinkedIn messaging that you want to capture, I would suggest you copy-and-paste to a Log Entry under the Contact. It’s kind of a pain… which is one reason I get to email (so I can use JibberJobber’s Email2Log feature).

So there you go … it sounds like Log Entries will take care of you.

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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JibberJobber Mobile Apps: Android and iOS (Apple)

June 21st, 2016

Liz asked me to let you know the mobile apps are available. I thought I did but I can see that I didn’t make a proper announcement… so…

THE JIBBERJOBBER MOBILE APPS ARE AVAILABLE!!!

Check out the JibberJobber mobile app page here.

JibberJobber for Android is here.

JibberJobber for iOS is here.

Please rate and review them, if you are in a good mood. If you are in a grumpy mood, well… be kind :p

What’s the plan with these mobile apps?  Just like we have updated and maintained the JibberJobber web tool for years and years, we’ll update and maintain the mobile apps.

The first update of the mobile apps is coming soon, based on lots of feedback from users.

Cost: free

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Putting The JibberJobber Upgrade Cost Into Perspective

June 20th, 2016

If you upgrade for a month on JibberJobber, it is $9.95. If you choose a one year upgrade, it is $60… or the equivalent to $5/month (that is, a 50% savings).

We work dang hard to provide value to you…. Let’s compare that to other things that you might relate to (some of these are approximates… but reasonably close… If I’m wrong on any of these, leave a comment):

“Limo” ride to airport in most places I’ve been: $75 + expected tip

LinkedIn upgrade: $299/year

Evernote upgrade: 24.99 year

Amazon Prime: $99/year

Netflix:$120/year

Hulu: $95.88/year

Inc magazine: $10/year

Costco membership: $55/year or $110/year

Sam’s Club membership: $45/year

Fill up my gas tank: about $40/week

Starbucks, 250 days, @3.50/cup: $875/year

Short cab ride in NYC: $40

Traffic ticket for improper lane change: $120 (don’t ask)

Dinner for four at an average restaurant: $50

Lower cost for dozen roses, delivered: $43.50

Skype (+skypein and voice mail): $36/year

Resume: $500 (give or take a thousand bucks)

Outplacement: $2,000 (give or take a few thousand)

The ladders: $99/year

Beyond.com: $24.95/month

I’m sure I’m missing some things… To those who spend money on JibberJobber, THANK YOU :)

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Microsoft Buys LinkedIn?

June 13th, 2016

Wow… didn’t see that coming.

Will be interesting to see what happens. My guess is nothing.  Looks to me like it will be run as an independent company…

Much of what I’m reading (in comments) reflects low confidence that this is a good move for LinkedIn.

So, this is a wonderful announcement for the owners, and time will tell how it will be for users.  Probably just as good as it has ever been.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Want a Shorter Job Search?

June 10th, 2016

I like Susan Joyce. I like her story, her passion, and her mission.  Her website, Job-hunt.org, has helped many people through the years.  She just shared her thoughts in an article on LinkedIn titled 10 Steps to a Shorter Job Search.

susan_joyce_linkedin_article

You know what sucks about any politician celebrating unemployment numbers?  This line from Susan’s first paragraph: “And over two million have been unemployed for one year or more.”

You know who those two million people are?  Regular people. Like you and me. I’ve met them across the U.S.  Very talented people.  People who have a lot to offer.  Many of the long-term unemployed I’ve met are struggling with age discrimination. Some were in their 50’s and 60’s… you kind of expect them to struggle with age discrimination, right?  I met plenty of people in their early 40’s that complained about age discrimination.

Here’s what I want you to do: read her post.  Make a checklist of things to do daily (or, regularly), and one-time things that you need to fix/do/cleanup. Then, make a list of things you would do AFTER you land your next job.  We live in a world of constant career management, and networking and things like that are must-dos, as part of the new normal.

I love everything Susan says… here are some of my comments:

#3: I say do MORE than one a week.  Perhaps five a week?  And have purposeful, strategic conversations.

#4: Yes, do this, but make sure it’s not spending time reading articles and news, etc.  Your time on LinkedIn as a job seeker is a time for strategic networking preparation. Finding who to talk to, who you want introductions to, and learning more about those people, is the reason you are spending time there.

#7: the key to The List is that you work the list, and figure out how to network in, and get new introductions from everyone you can along the way. Making a list isn’t a job search… working the list, with a purpose, is.

#9: that is why I offer JibberJobber users a 30 day pass…!

Susan’s article deserves your time and attention.  If you need to recalibrate, this is the article for you. Jump over now.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Writing: LinkedIn Profile vs. Resume

June 9th, 2016

Recently someone emailed me asking for my opinion about their LinkedIn Profile. This person had just paid for resume and LinkedIn work, and wasn’t quite happy with the LinkedIn work. It looked like a copy/paste of the resume.

I think it’s important to differentiate the purpose and the opportunity of the resume from the LinkedIn Profile. The resume has limitations (number of pages, language you should use, what you can put on it, etc.) that generally should not be on the LinkedIn Profile.

One of the most important things to think about who is reading either of these marketing documents, and why.

If you have a resume that is too funky (let’s say, comic font with pink paper, and narrative stories), people will think you are a nut and discard it.  You have to play within the rules, and those are way outside the rules.  You have to start each sentence (bullet point) with a strong action word (increased sales, reduced bad guys, etc.). You should provide solid quantifications of your achievements. Your audience is generally a recruiter, or hiring manager, or HR person.  They want to compare your resume (which is a marketing document…. have I mentioned that yet?) with five or ten other resumes… if your formatting or messaging is apples to orange s, you will either really stand out or you will be incomprehensible or distracting to the point where it’s hard to compare.  It’s like they ask you a question and you don’t give them the answer to the question they asked.

There is really little creative freedom, in style and content, that you can put into your resume.  I think this is why some people have cried over the last ten years that the resume is dying.  Until the massively slow moving beast we call HR declares resumes dead, rest assured that resumes will be around, and used, for many years to come.

The LinkedIn Profile is a marketing document that gives you much more freedom. I don’t like to see “resume-speak” on a LinkedIn Profile. In addition to recruiters, hiring managers and HR, you’ll have others who read it (that is, you have an expanded audience). Their purpose is different, and so their presentation and content should be different.

Because the purpose is different, the “rules” are different, and the expectations of the reader is (or should be) different, I suggest a different style, and kind of a different message (kind of because it should be consistent, but it doesn’t have to be 100% the same).

I like a more narrative, more personal, more personable approach on a LinkedIn Profile. I talk about “mini stories.” I talk about your primary and secondary value propositions, and then supporting those value props in the rest of the Profile.

How do you do that?  NOT the same way you do it on a resume.

Want more? You can see my LinkedIn courses on Pluralsight (at no cost – I can hook you up with a 30 day pass), or I do LinkedIn Profile critiques/reviews – email me if you want details (Jason@JibberJobber.com).

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Soft Skills Pluralsight Review Thoughts by Steven McEvoy

June 7th, 2016

stevenMcEvoy_headshotSteven McEvoy is a senior systems analyst and DevOps professional in Canada.  Earlier this year he wrote a really cool blog post (Jason Alba – Pluralsight, JibberJobber, Author and more) just about my courses… here are some of my favorite parts:

Okay, that title is pretty cool.  I work in a home office (with a distributed team, of course) and sometimes it’s easy to feel alone and not remember some of the things I’ve accomplished. Just seeing those three major accomplishments is pretty cool.  For job seekers: when you feel lonely, alone, or unaccomplished, start listing (aka brainstorming) ANY accomplishment you’ve ever had. EVER. Big, small, everything. This could be a running list that will grow.  You might be surprised at all the cool things you’ve ever done, but have forgotten. Need a pickmeup?  That is it!

“I am very impressed with Jason’s presenting style. He is engaging, entertaining and honest. His courses are great.”  Here’s a bit of the backstory: When I sat down to do my first Pluralsight course I was quite lost.  I was just finishing a run of speaking for a few years in person. Probably hundreds of presentations on a stage, and I don’t know how many dozens of webinars. From a stage I feed off of the audience’s energy. The first laugh I get is all I need to keep going.  In a webinar, I get way less feedback, but I do monitor the chat window, and sometimes there are others who are talking.  I had trained my presentations skills to be optimized for a live audience.  But doing a recording course? WAY different. In my live course I like to have very few words on a slide.  In a record course, I don’t have eye contact, I can’t gauge engagement, and one word slides, I think, weren’t going to work.  Anyway, this is too long to say: it took me a while to find and hone my style.  And I’m really grateful that it’s appreciated. For job seekers: sometimes (many times?) we just have to get out of our comfort zone, whether we want to or not.

“He teaches on a wide range of skills and competencies that will help you grow, but not just in your abilities at work these skills can transfer to all areas of your life.” Yes….  my hope is that your soft/people skills will improve and you will have richer relationships, at work, and outside of work. Imagine improving ourselves so we are better in all of our relationships, not just the ones at work. For job seekers: you can tell an employer the obvious (that you are good at your job) but can you illustrate the benefits they will get from your job well-done?

“I will warn you once you start learning with Jason or Pluralsight you won’t want to stop you might become hooked…” That is pretty nice to say :)  For job seekers: What are you doing, or what can you do, to have employers and network contacts “hooked” on you?

I recently submitted the proposal for my 30th Pluralsight course.  30 is a lot… I don’t know how many authors have that many courses.  I’m glad to offer a 30 day pass to JibberJobber users, where they can watch all of my courses (or any of the almost 5,000 courses) at no cost.  After 30 days, a monthly subscription is a low $29.  Bonus: Each Jason Alba course you watch, report back and we’ll upgrade you on JibberJobber for another 7 days. There is no limit to this bonus. Learn how here.

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Planning Your Career Path (Wendy Terwelp)

June 6th, 2016

I saw this image from Wendy Terwelp (this is totally aligned with my newest Pluralsight pretty course: Building and Managing Your Career Plan.  You can get free access to this course with a 30 day pass… click here for the steps.

career-path-wendy-terwelp

I think one of the most important messages from this image is that there are too many uncontrollable factors/variables, and we need to learn how to embrace and work with change.

What other lessons can we get from this image?

 

 

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job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Who Do You Blame In The Job Search?

June 3rd, 2016

This is a fascinating read: Are You Blaming Self for Being Unemployed?

Here’s my comment to Alex, on LinkedIn where he posted a link to his blog:

I talked to Ofer, and have heard a lot about him from Susan P Joyce. Great guy. I definitely blamed myself for more than I should have during my job search…. what helped was going to job clubs meeting people who were better (more qualified) than I was, and learning about their story. I figured out that it wasn’t me… it was circumstance. No one is immune.

I’m not suggesting you should blame one or the other, but I know that many of you are blaming yourself. Sometimes that blame is well-placed.  But we need to move past the blame and get to a point where we can be functional job seekers.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Change is inevitable (Update on “The Dress”)

June 2nd, 2016

“JibberJobber is like a beautiful woman in an ugly dress.” – some investor, a few years ago.

When JibberJobber launched, 10 years ago, the world was different.  Users were different.  They kind of took what they could.  Over the years I got comments like “I don’t trust JibberJobber with my credit card because the site looks old.”

So, we started the hunt for someone who could help us with our design.  Back then I was looking for someone who specialized in UI, or “user interface.”  This should mean many things, but in my mind, today, it just means look and feel.

In 2012 we invested in a UI guy, and he made huge improvements (see images below). I was pretty happy with him, although I had a few reservations on color and some design stuff.  But overall, it was a great change, and we were moving in the right direction.

The day after we released his new design, I got an email from someone saying “your site looks too outdated.” What?? One day after all of our UI changes, I still got complaints?

Ugh.

I realized this is something I could not win. Meanwhile, I had some new competitors (over the last 10 years there have been about 20 competitors, most of them are gone now) who launched with BEAUTIFUL design. Seriously beautiful. But, (a) their users came over to JibberJobber because, even though we weren’t as beautiful, we had functional breadth and depth, and some of those sites were only beautiful, but not functional enough (hey, when you are doing personal CRM, you really need functional!), and (b) yeah, those sites didn’t all last.  What can I say.  I’ll be the tortoise to their hare.

I knew that instead of focusing my limited resources on trying to hit this moving target of “make it prettier,” I needed to continue to focus on functionality.  JibberJobber has A LOT of functionality… stuff we’ve been developing over a 10 year period.

However, there was still an issue… and that is that people would sign up, get confused, and delete their account out of frustration. This was not a UI issue, it was what we call a UX issue.  UX stands for “user experience.”  Instead of focusing on colors and curves and aesthetics, we needed to answer this question:

How can we help the person who signs up figure out what to do next?

Instead of logging in and then staring at the screen in utter frustration, how could we help them know what next steps they could or should do?

That is more about the user EXPERIENCE (hence, UX).  And for that, I finally, after 10 years, found the right person to help me put this together.  His name is Udie Chima, and he has been awesome.  In our conversations, he focuses on what our objectives are (which include getting more signups, and helping those signups become “users,” and eventually enticing users to actually upgrade).  Instead of focusing on a color or a curve, he focuses on THE EXPERIENCE.

All this to say, we have changes coming.  You might have already noticed one of them. Let me run through the history a bit, just for fun.

VERSION 2 (I don’t know if I have images of Version 1)

When we first launched, two people had “designed” JibberJobber. My first programmer, still with JibberJobber, and me.  Neither of us are designers. We are good at functional, but not aesthetic. Hence, we got a lot of comments like “it looks like this was designed by programmers.”  Because, well, it was.  Here’s what JibberJobber used to look like, about 10 years ago:

JJ_ux_2010

Notice the top (1) has an ad for my LinkedIn book.  The menu (2) is dark blue/purple, and rounded corners… and the footer (3) is, well, as important as a footer should be.  Not bad for 2006, I guess.  Again, the focus was on functionality.

Version 3

This was “the new dress.”

JJ_ux_2015_top

This is a cleaner look… moving the search box from the right side to the top-right… and less “heavy.”  Good changes, which we’ve had for a while.

JJ_ux_2015_bottom

This footer is cleaner, and emphasizes things because they are in three columns… I LOVE the app icons (because they are relatively new). The left is the policy and help stuff… the middle is social and other (mobile), and the right is upgrade and contact us and content value-add.

Version 4

 

JJ_ux_2016_top

This is Udie’s design. There are many things going on here… but most visibly, we are shifting the menu to the very top, like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, WordPress, and many other sites do.  This is just “how it’s done” now, and it’s clean and easy, and people expect it.  The top, in blue, is the top level menu. Much of it is the same as what we have had, but we cleaned some stuff up. Notably, we added a home icon (before you had to figure out to click the icon)… notice, also, the help link on the right, and the settings icon on the far right.

The second level menu has the most important “calls to action” for new users. Instead of “what do I do now,” I would expect them to see that here, in JibberJobber, you can (drum roll) add a Contact, add a Company, add a Job, and add a Log Entry.  This is really the core of the value to JibberJobber users, so why not show them how to do these tasks easily?  And, because we are not allergic to money, or paying our bills, we want the idea of upgrading to be a little more obvious… The invitation to upgrade, and unlock the very cool premium features, was somewhat hidden in the past. No longer…. we’re happy to finance JibberJobber through making users happy :)

This second level menu is the difference between UI (“oooh, pretty!”) and UX (“oh, now I know what to do!!”).

JJ_ux_2016_bottom

This footer is still vertically compact. and what were the three columns are now broken down and easier to see.  The four columns on the right are even strategically grouped.

So… there you go, we changed THE DRESS again.  More to come!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

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