Ask The Experts: Who Do You Want To Hear From?

October 24th, 2014

The monthly Ask The Experts calls were some of the funnest interviews I’ve done since I started JibberJobber.  Below is a list of past interviews – I know there is an overabundance of information coming your way, but I strongly suggest you add these recordings to your schedule. There are a ton of great ideas, suggestions and perspectives that can help you in job search and career management.

My question to you is: WHO do you think I should interview next?

It’s time to start up the next round… and I want to hear from YOU who I should invite to be on the show.  Leave a comment with names and the “why,” or shoot me an email (which is on the Contact Us page (or just use the Contact Us form)) with suggestions.

Here are past interviews:

Fred Coon: Stewart Cooper Coon Outplacement

Robert Merrill: Internal Tech Recruiter

The Recruiting Animal

Dan Schawbel: Personal Branding and Millenials

Mark LeBlanc: Business Growth Coach

Dave Perry: Guerrilla Marketing for Job Hunters

Jack Chapman: Salary Negotiation

Jason Alba: 51 Alternatives to a Real Job

Dick Bolles: What Color Is Your Parachute

Nick Corcodilos: Ask The Headhunter

Tim Tyrell-Smith: Tim’s Strategy

Jason Alba: CEO of JibberJobber

Karen Huller: Resume Writer and Career Coach

Charlotte Weeks: Weeks Career Services

Jon Sosa: Aries Career Development

Kim Mohuiddin: Movin’ On Up Resumes

 

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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JibberJobber in the News (TheMuse.com, Time Magazine, Philly.com): Organize Your Job Search

October 22nd, 2014

I don’t share this as often as I should, but I’ll share it today. JibberJobber is regularly recommended by career professionals as a great tool to organize and track your job search.  You already know about TheMuse.com article (I blogged about it here), where we were #2 on the list of 10 Job Search Tricks That Will Change Everything You’ve Been Doing.

Yesterday Time Magazine reprinted the article, written by Anna Runyan.  We’ve been in US News and World Report and a few other magazines, but I think this is the first time we’ve been mentioned in Time (and a nice mention it is!).

time_magazine_jibberjobber

Not too long ago in Philly.com, Rita Friedman recommended JibberJobber as the tracking system you should use. The article is What’s in your job search toolkit?  I should note that in her article she talks about elevator pitches, your credentials, your interview stories, and references… all of which you can track and store in JibberJobber.  She says “with these tools you’ll be ready to dive into a serious job search.

I guess it’s worth mentioning that someone at Business Insider took one of my LinkedIn articles and used that to create an article on Business Insider.  At least they gave it attribution :)  The comments there are the kind that destroy faith in humanity… but I’ll blog about that tomorrow :)

Thanks to the career professionals who recommend JibberJobber, and welcome to the new users who have found us through those recommendations!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Why Track Jobs That You Wouldn’t Apply To?

October 21st, 2014

Stephen is a very smart user who has emailed my team with a number of ideas enhancement requests.  Stephen said that he uses JibberJobber to track jobs that he applies to, but also to track jobs he doesn’t apply to.  I thought this was interesting.

Why would you track jobs that you aren’t going to apply to?

Stephen’s reasons:

  • To gain insight into other needs of the company, departments, systems, etc.
  • To perhaps identify issues the company has (like high turnover)

I would add:

  • To understand what the market is currently looking for, with key words and phrases I could use in my marketing (networking, cover letters, resumes, interviews, etc.)

When I was in my job search I learned about a job title that I really hadn’t understood or thought about while I was looking for openings.  There is great information in job descriptions… are you tapping into that information?

When you find a word, phrase, or idea to enhance your knowledge or marketing message, keep track of it!

To do this in JibberJobber, I would simply tag each job I am not applying to as “reference” (or some other tag that makes more sense for you).  Then, you could filter the Jobs List Panel like this:

tags:reference

This would give you a list of all of the job descriptions/postings for your research.

In addition, I would make Log Entries (or Notes) on WHY I saved the job.

Remember, putting a job posting into JibberJobber will save it there forever, but if you just save a link, the link might be dead in a few months.  Jobs don’t stay on job boards for long.

Cool idea, huh?

Thanks Stephen!

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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How To: Use a Contact Manager (JibberJobber is a Contact Manager)

October 17th, 2014

david_bradford_headshotI’m reading David Bradford’s book Up Your Game, and on page 41  he talks about using a contact manager.

David is the consummate networker who has also had a terrific career.  He’s a grandpa living in Utah and just recently was the CEO of HireVue, and before that, CEO of the amazing Fusion-IO. He is active on social media and has a big, giving heart.

Back to the “contact manager” concept.  In the olden days (well, actually, even today) most people had not heard of a “contact manager.”  Everyone had heard of a Roladex, which is an old-fashioned device that sat on your desk, and allowed you to quickly flip through cards that had your contacts’ information on them so you could find their phone number and call them.  Here’s a modern-looking roladex (image courtesy wikipedia):

roladex_image

According to what I’ve found online, ACT! was the first digital contact manager – that is, a contact manager on a computer.  It was 1986 (where were YOU in 1986??) and ACT! would be the first of hundreds.  There were a few others that you probably haven’t heard of, the one I briefly used was Goldmine.  Today you have likely heard of the massive $5B/annual company Salesforce.com.  Perhaps there are thousands of CRM systems now.

CRM stands for Customer Relationship Management… and this software has mostly been designed for sales professionals.  Some of them LOVE the software, and live-and-die on CRM, and others abhor CRM (because they are people people, and not software nerds).

The Roladex, and the little black book of contacts, were for anyone trying to keep track of their friend/family, etc.

CRM was really mostly for salespeople.  Who else would pay that much for software that was that hard to use, when all you really wanted was a place to write down a phone number?

When David wrote about using a “contact manager” in his book, I got excited.  He is not using it as a sales professional, he’s using it as a real contact manager!  He’s using it to keep track of who is is meeting, what their important phone information is, when he communicates with them, and when he needs to follow-up.

Let me break that down, and make this a “how to” post.  This is more of a “how to get value out of a contact manager” than how to use any bells and whistles.  And just for fun, I’m going to use “JibberJobber” instead of “contact manager.”

First, store your contacts in  JibberJobber.

You can store all of them, but you don’t need to.  Don’t get stressed that one system (perhaps your email contact list) has contacts that are not in JibberJobber, or that LinkedIn doesn’t have all of the same contacts as you have in JibberJobber.  Recognize that these are different systems with different purposes.  The purpose of your contact manager (JibberJobber) is not to have the contacts everwhere else, but to serve as a central repository of IMPORTANT contacts that you are, can or want to nurture.  If someone comes into your life through LinkedIn, eventually they’ll probably end up in JibberJobber.

Second, record information about those contacts.

When you first enter a contact, you likely won’t have all of the information you could put in about them.  I usually start with just the first name, last name, and email address.  As my relationship progresses, or as we exchange more and more emails, I will find out other information, like a work address or phone number, which might be in their official work email.  Just collect this information as you get it, and gradually enter it into JibberJobber.  Don’t stress about not having it to begin with…

Third, record important communication as “log entries.”  

When you reach out to someone, or respond to them, log it into JibberJobber.  I don’t do this all the time, but as I’m starting a relationship I’ll log any communication just to put a timeframe around how fast or slow our relationship is forming.  Once I have a strong relationship with someone, I find myself logging communications less, but the quality of what I’m logging increases.  For example, we meet at a networking event and I send you an email.  I’ll log that email, even though it’s not going to have anything more substantial than “nice to meet you – let’s get on a call next week.”  A few years later I’m not going to log every email we exchange, but if there is something big, or important, then I’ll log that.  Don’t beat yourself up for not logging everything… you’ll get used to what you really want to track and what you don’t need to.

Fourth, indicate when you need to follow-up with your contacts.

This might be one of the hardest things to do, and track, for people who are starting to get serious about networking.  Why?  Because the more you network, the more follow-up you can do!  And it feels rotten to meet people, start a relationship, and then forget when to follow-up, or who they were, or why you should follow-up, etc.  In JibberJobber, you’ll create “action items,” which is basically a due date on a log entry.  You can even create recurring action items, which means you can say “Ping Johnny every quarter,” to help you nurture relationships over the long-term.

Keith Ferrazzi says that if you want to be better than 95% of your competition, all you have to do is follow-up.  We know this, but there’s a reason why 95 out of 100 people don’t do it: it’s hard to manage!

Let JibberJobber be your contact manager and your follow-up tool.

The focus is not on sales, rather on relationships.

Are you ready to get serious about this yet?  Jump on a User Orientation webinar, and let’s start by taking baby steps together.

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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How to Explain a Sabbatical If You Were Taking Care of an Ailing Parent or Loved One

October 16th, 2014

Last week I was doing a LinkedIn consultation with a professional who had taken time (a couple of years?) off to care for her father. She has had a fantastic, awesome career, but didn’t know how to explain her years off.  She asked me how to explain this, and I reached out to career professionals in the Career Directors LinkedIn Group for advice.  The experience these professionals have is broad and deep, which is why I like getting input from different professionals.  Below is what I learned. I hope this can help you if you are in this situation:

don_goodman_headshotDon Goodman, Certified Resume Writer, GotTheJob.com, and reseller of my video course: LinkedIn for Job Seekers

I would say,

Sabbatical (Date) – Attended to urgent family matters now fully resolved,

or

Sabbatical (Date) – Attended to needs of ailing parent now fully resolved,

It is perfectly OK to help family members in need and all the employer needs to know is that it is completed.

mary_schumacher_headshotMary Schumacher, Writer and Coach, CareerFrames.com 

Hi Jason – I would also use a sabbatical statement such as the ones Don provided. I also might just insert a statement such as:

“Took two-year leave to serve as caretaker for parent. Stayed current on industry trends and learning to remain fully prepared for next corporate challenge.”

Employers want to know that your knowledge is up-to-date as far as their needs, and that your skills aren’t rusty. There are plenty of free online courses to help even those very immersed in their caretaker roles.

irene_marshall_headshotIrene Marshall, Executive Resume Writer and LinkedIn Profile Writer, ToolsForTransition.com

Jason — I don’t think it requires a big explanation. I would either put “Family sabbatical,” “Personal Sabbatical” or “Professional Sabbatical” without adding anything else in either resume or cover letter. It just accounts for the time. And I only use years, not months/years.

There are millions and millions of Baby Boomers taking care of parents (myself included). And over the past several years I have worked with many people who have relocated, quit their jobs or took part-time work to handle what their parents need.

It is very common now and nothing your client should be nervous about. You never know that maybe the person reading would have given their eye teeth to be able to take time off work rather than feeling guilty that their job was keeping them from doing it..

I moved my mother with Alzheimer’s into assisted living in January. I was at part-time work until about the end of July because none of her affairs were in order. And I’m still dealing with two attorneys, etc. even though I’m close to full time work now. I would have had to quit a corporate job.

But in the first half of the year there was absolutely no way I could have been doing anything related to my work for keeping up with my industry or anything else. I was up to 3 am, 5 am and more trying to sell my mother’s home and everything else. I would not have been able to even think about online coursework because it frankly was not my top priority and I was exhausted.

And I wouldn’t include “fully resolved” because I think it then puts the reader in a slightly awkward position of assuming that mom or dad actually died.

christine_robinson_headshotChristine Robinson, CPRW, ChristineRobinsonCPRW.com

Jason, I try to be as straightforward as possible, composing a quote based on the client’s circumstance. Also, I usually refer to it as a “professional leave” or “career break” because I feel the word “sabbatical” has some nuances that don’t necessarily apply to every situation.

I place the quote under the Professional Experience heading.

2012 to Oct. 2014: “I took a professional leave to attend to my terminally ill brother; following his passing, I engaged in a variety of professional development opportunities to maintain credentials and volunteer roles to keep abreast of industry trends.”

You get the gist. It may be wordy and it may be slightly shocking, but on the other hand, it leaves nothing to the imagination of the reader. Plus, the dates will (ideally) be captured by ATS.

Thanks to Don, Mary, Irene and Christine for sharing their thoughts – if you have a different idea, please share it in the comments below!

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

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Should You Really Keep JibberJobber Contacts in Sync with Everything Else?

October 13th, 2014

On Friday I wrote How To: Import Contacts Into JibberJobber Without Creating Duplicates, explaining how we do a dup check before you import… it’s a pretty nifty tool/feature.

I want to address a different question from Michael’s original message to us, where he says:

>> … my contacts from [LinkedIn, Outlook, and Facebook] are constantly changing so all of this will then need to be updated within JibberJobber to stay current.

Yes, those three databases will change… but I want to think about this “need to be updated in JibberJobber” idea.

If you add a new friend in Facebook, do they really need to be in JibberJobber?

If you add a new contact in Outlook, or in LinkedIn, do they need to be in JibberJobber?

I would suggest that they do not need to be in JibberJobber.

I have new additions to LinkedIn regularly, as well as new additions to my email contact list.  I do not regularly update them in JibberJobber.

I put a lot of people in JibberJobber, adding more contacts there per week than any other place (probably more than my email, LinkedIn and Facebook combined).  But I’m not too worried about have any of them in sync.

This is because JibberJobber is my central networking, relationship and tracking tool.  When we get serious in our relationship, I’m not worried about you being a “friend” in Facebook.  I’m not worried about connecting with you in LinkedIn.  I’m not even that worried about you ending up in my email contact list (although just by emailing me you are already in that tracking system).

But I WILL get you into JibberJobber.  I’ll track your contact information (as I get it – I might have the email address at first, and eventually a phone number or two), and I’ll track the important conversations we have.

I’m guessing 70%+ of my Log Entries are created with Email2Log.  This means that with very little effort, I’m able to keep my central relationship tracking tool (JibberJobber) updated with active contacts, and our email conversations.

If we have an active relationship, I’m likely emailing you.  Since it’s so easy to get a new Contact into JibberJobber with Email2Log, and the email becomes a Log Entry, I do a lot of my data entry with that tool.

This means that even though JibberJobber isn’t in sync with my other networking tools, it does have the most important, current relationships in the system.

Don’t get overwhelmed by trying to keep all of your systems in sync… let’s just focus on tracking what we need to track.  The beauty of this is, if you do decide to put someone into JibberJobber that is in Facebook, (1) it’s easy to do, and (2) it’s easy to copy/paste whatever data you need from Facebook when it is the right time.

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How To: Import Contacts Into JibberJobber Without Creating Duplicates

October 10th, 2014

I got a great question from Michael about importing, and the potential for creating duplicates.  In short, he is asking about importing regularly… let’s say monthly.  If I import from LinkedIn today, then I import from LinkedIn next month, aren’t I going to create a whole bunch of duplicates? (you can see his original question and comments in the box at the bottom of this post…

In short, no, it shouldn’t re-import duplicates.

In this very important blog post, where I describe three steps to import from systems like LinkedIn, the third step has an image of the import screen with some yellow rows and some white rows (scroll to the bottom of that post to see the images).  The yellow rows are for those records that we think are already in the system…. so, if you import 100 records today, then pull your contacts from LinkedIn (or Google or wherever) next month, and you have 125, the 100 you already imported will be in yellow, and not imported.  The left-most column is a checkbox where you can choose to override the option to not import… but in general, as long as the row is yellow (and in that case, the checkbox to import will be unchecked), you will not create new duplicates each time you import.

That’s pretty cool, huh?

The bottom line is that you will have duplicates… I still get them and I know all the tricks.  For example, let’s say I have John Doe as one of my Contacts.  His email is John@Doe.com.  He emails me from his personal email address (johndoe@hotmail.com), and I reply back with the Email2Log feature without really thinking about it.  I don’t take the time to see if the hotmail email is on his record… I just shoot a reply back and… well, I get a duplicate.

This could be frustrating, but really, it’s so easy to clean up and MERGE the duplicates that not only do I not worry about it, it isn’t an urgent need to merge the duplicates.  I can continue to put Log Entries on both records… and when I finally get around to it, merge them, and all Log Entries are merged under the one record.  It makes duplicates a minor nuisance, but not a mess that you might think it would be.

Here’s Michael’s original question and comments, which I thought was too darn cool to just summarize as a question (Michael, thanks for the kind words!). I’ve took the liberty to throw a comma in here, and make other visual changes to his comment:

Okay, so I’m seeing the power here of importing all my contacts from LinkedIn, Outlook, and Facebook and I’ve figured out how to do so.I also understand how to delete unnecessary contacts and merge duplicate contacts in JibberJobber once I’ve done so. HOWEVER, my contacts from all three sources are constantly changing so all of this will then need to be updated within JibberJobber to stay current.

Since JibberJobber doesn’t have a two-way sync, I will need to go back to my source in the case of Outlook where I have control over the content, make the changes there, and then reimport the data perhaps weekly or monthly, correct?

That said, how on earth do I keep from having to go back through and rescrub all the data within JibberJobber to re-delete unnecessary contacts and re-merge duplicates?

My fear is that i’m going to do a ton of work to get JibberJobber updated one time and then a month later spend another enormous amount of time refreshing JibberJobber all over again. Please help me understand how this can/will work?

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

Find a Career You Love Webinar (Anna Runyan)

October 9th, 2014

anna_runyan_headshotYesterday TheMuse.com author and career coach Anna Runyan included JibberJobber in her 10 Job Search Tricks That Will Change Everything You’ve Been Doing article.  She said to “use JibberJobber to keep track of information you collect during your job search.”  She also mentioned another tool to “manage and organize business cards you collect,” which JibberJobber does nicely, and a different tool to “create an automatic follow-up system,” which JibberJobber also does.

Yes, we really are that amazing. 

Enough about us, though. I want to reciprocate the kind shout-out and tell you about Anna.  She created  the “Love Your Career Formula,” which is a formula we could all use.  Tonight she is doing a free webinar called “How to Ditch Your Dead End Job and Find a Career You Love.”

The good thing about most JibberJobber users is that they have already “ditched” their job…. so that part is taken care of :)   And they are intensely focused on finding a career… let’s join the webinar tonight to make sure we are doing the right things so the career we are chasing is one we’ll love!

Sign up here…

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How To: Get Started on JibberJobber

October 8th, 2014

A frequently asked question from newbies is how do I get started?  What do I do first?  Then what do I do?

This is kind of a hard question to answer because it kind of depends on how you work, what you are trying to accomplish, etc.  But let me take the question 10,000 feet up and assume that I’m advising my mom (hi mom!) on how to get started using JibberJobber.  Let’s say my mom just got laid off and is looking for a new job.  What should she do first on JibberJobber?

There really isn’t a first thing to do… there are a few first things to do (yes, I numbered them all #1 on purpose):

1. DO NOT get overwhelmed.  This is a mental thing… but the first thing I want you to think about is that you can do this.  Look, the job search is a complex thing.  You have to organize and manage A LOT of information and data.  Who you meet, their contact info, what you talked about, when you need to follow-up.  What your target companies are, who works there, what version of which resume did you share with who, and when you need to follow-up (and with who, and how).  What jobs you are interested in, when you applied to what jobs, how did you apply, how do you follow-up, are you networking into that company, etc.  I this was simply a linear, logical process, it could be easier to manage, BUT we’re dealing with human beings here.  There is not right way to do anything (like interview) that works every single time, in every company, in every industry, for every job.  You have to be totally on top of your game.  Having said that, JibberJobber can help you with a lot of this complexity.  Instead of feeling like you are drowning in information, and overwhelmed with complexity, use JibberJobber to help organize and manage.  One of my earliest users and evangelists said “JibberJobber is my virtual assistant.”  I love that he thought of it that way – let it help you not feel overwhelmed.

Further, there is a lot you can do in JibberJobber, but as you get started I want you to not worry about what you can do, but focus on what you should do.  In general, your job search should be about networking and follow-up (and of course, a lot more, but that is a critical part of your job search strategy).  Start there.  You can ignore the other features until you are ready for them.

1. Think of JibberJobber as a long-term career management tool.  You will collect a lot of information, or as I like to call it, “intelligence,” in your job search.  Names, numbers, email addresses, who works where, who interviewed you, who you liked and who was a complete jerk, what you talked about, when you followed-up, etc. Can you imagine collecting all of this important information and then throwing it away?  I have heard from too many job seekers who have found their dream job and within months, or usually a few years, found themselves in transition again. The new “career management” is to change jobs regularly… please, please, please don’t treat your time on JibberJobber, and the data you collect, as a temporary band-aid solution.  What you do here, now, should help you for the duration of your career!

1. Sign up for the JibberJobber Orientation.  We do these almost every Wednesday. Sign-up here. If you can’t attend a live one, schedule ten minutes a day and watch a recording in parts. Speaking of ten minutes, we do a “Focus Friday” each Friday where we (a) focus on one feature/topic for just ten minutes, and (b) stay on and answer your questions.  You can sign up once and then just attend the Focus Friday webinars you can.

1. Import contacts from LinkedIn, Outlook, Gmail, etc.  A lot of people like to come into JibberJobber and see contacts there. LinkedIn doesn’t make it super easy to export contacts (here’s how you do it), but you usually get contacts out of your other systems into a csv format.  You can then import those into JibberJobber.  You can also SYNC your contacts between JibberJobber and Gmail, which allows you to put your JibberJobber Contacts onto your phone in the phone’s native contacts app.  I’m not going to say this is a critical “getting started” step, but a lot of people want to do it (which is fine).

1. Set up your Email2Log and use it right now.  This is easily the coolest, most powerful feature in JibberJobber, and I use it multiple times every day.  The concept is this: when you send an email, put a special and unique-to-you email2log email address in the BCC field.  The email will go to JibberJobber where we will (a) create new contacts, if the other recipients are not already your contacts in JibberJobber, and (b) it will take your email and make it a Log Entry. This is SO VERY powerful and cool, and it easily saves me 30+ minutes a day from doing all this administrative stuff by hand.

1. Enter a new Contact, Company and Job. You can enter them in any order… it doesn’t matter which you enter first.  Put in a recruiter with only the information that really matters (does a fax, or street address really matter?  Probably not.).   Put in a job the recruiter sent to you (or one you found on Indeed).  Enter a contact, even if it is just you.  This is easy stuff, but it’s the core of JibberJobber, and you’ll likely be doing this a fair amount over the next few weeks.

1. Create a Log Entry and Action Item.  Once you have a Contact, Company or Job in JibberJobber, go to the Detail Page of that record and create a Log Entry.  For example: “I had lunch with Jason today. We talked about xyz, I need to follow-up on abc.”  Then, click the Action Item link and put a date to follow-up. This is another core feature in JibberJobber, and should help you keep things from slipping through the cracks.  Your job search, and career management, is about “nurturing relationships” and “follow-up” and this is how you manage that.

There is more you can do.  This is probably just 10% of the functionality… but this is the GETTING STARTED advice I would give my mom.  Pretty simple, right?

Really, make sure you get on an orientation webinar, and please do not hesitate to ask us for help.  When you ask us for help, you help us understand where people are getting stuck, which can help many other people!

 

 

 

what where
job title, keywords or company
city, state or zip jobs by job search

JibberJobber is a powerful tool that lets you manage your career, from job search to relationship management to target company management (and much more). Free for life with an optional upgrade.

Sign Up Now! »

How to Block People on LinkedIn

October 6th, 2014

On Facebook my colleague and well-respected career expert Susan Whitcomb asked if there was a way to block people from seeing updates in LinkedIn.  The typical scenerio is that someone starts a job search, and wants to NOT broadcast that to their network.  They might update their resume, post an “update” on the homepage, participate in groups, etc…. how do you block individuals from seeing what you are doing?

The short answer is, YOU CANNOT.

This question about privacy reminds me of my IT security professor back in the 90′s who said that if you want or expect any privacy, UNPLUG your computer from the internet.  Period.

You really shouldn’t have any assumption or expectation of privacy online, ever.

In LinkedIn, there aren’t any foolproof ways to shut people out of what you are doing.  In fact, you can’t even do that in Facebook.

Let me give you an example. Facebook has more refined personal privacy options than LinkedIn does, partially because of what Facebook is for and what LinkedIn is for.  Anyway, even with the very tight privacy settings in Facebook, it’s possible to *think* you are ranting privately, and you kind of are.  But what if one of your “friends” shares your rant with someone you mutually know, who you have blocked?

The rant isn’t so private anymore, is it?

What if they take a screenshot of your rant and post it on a blog?

Not private at all, huh?

You can have all the locks in place, but as long as humans are involved, there is potential for social engineering, which means that your update you thought was private is now shared in the lunchroom and boardrooms of your current company.

OOPS.

Are there security options in LinkedIn to block?  Kind of.

Should you trust them?  Only if… well, actually, NO.  NEVER.

But what if you aren’t connected with anyone at your company?

Um… let me explain how LinkedIn works: it doesn’t matter!

They can go to LinkedIn and still see some (most) of your stuff.  They can also do a search on Google and find some (most) of your stuff.  LinkedIn, by it’s nature, is a place to find and be found, to be visible, to share your brand, experience, etc.  It’s not a place to hide stuff.  That’s what a diary is for (you know, the book you write stuff in, and it’s not connected to the Internet!?).

Like I said, there are some technical privacy tools in place, kind of … BUT none of those matter as long as ANYONE in your network might share what you posted with their contacts… who just might be your boss you are trying to hide from.

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