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Gen Y Whiners, Baby Boomers Out Of Touch: The Problem with Stereotyping

February 14th, 2011
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Friday I shared a Favorite Friday about Gen Y acting like a bunch of whiners.  It was a good post, and the comments were amazing.

There is a major problem with any stereotyping (generational, color, religion, etc.).

The problem is that IT IS WRONG to stereotype.

By stereotyping we assign certain character traits, or characteristics, to people, simply based on certain criteria.

Like the really tall guy who is always asked “do you play basketball?” … just because he’s tall.

Or the ____ ethnic group who is assumed to be really, really good at math.

Or the geeky looking (emphasis on the “looking”) person who, of course, can fix your computer.

Or the ______ who _______.

The sad thing is that we automatically assigning things which are likely false to a someone based on something (color, etc.).

We all know this is bad.

But we all do it.  You do it. I do it. We all do it.  When we do it innocently we don’t think much of it.  But when we are on the other end of the table, getting discriminated against, it’s outrageous, isn’t it?

This reality sucks.

This reality also presents a real “opportunity.”  We, individually, have to break through these unfair stereotypes and define who we are.

When we send a resume, or go to a networking event, or are in an interview, we might be wrogfully stereotyped.

Our opportunity is to break through the stereotype, and let the right, true characteristics scream out louder than the stereotyped characteristics.

Can you do that?

Can anyone do it?

Yes, indeed, we can.

I think I know how, but I’ll ask you: how do you make your own defining characteristics stand out more than the stereotyped characteristics?

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One response to “Gen Y Whiners, Baby Boomers Out Of Touch: The Problem with Stereotyping”

  1. […] I have blogged about it here: Gen Y Sounds Like A Bunch Of Entitled Whiners. I talk about the issue of stereotyping here. […]