Comment

The JibberJobber Job Journal #favoriteFriday

July 19th, 2019

jibberjobber-favorite-fridayA few years ago I wrote about a new feature that is, in my opinion, one of the most important features in JibberJobber. The Job Journal is a tool where you simply write down your career success stories.

Why is that so important?

Because it is all about what and how we brand ourselves. I’ve interviewed people who were not prepared with stories and examples, and people who were prepared. The contrast is huge.

I want you to think about your career wins, big and small, and figure out how those wins can become stories to demonstrate your capabilities.

Check out the entire post here: What is the Job Journal?

Leave a Comment »

Comment

Are Job Boards a Waste of Time? Hint: NO. #favoriteFriday

July 12th, 2019

jibberjobber-favorite-fridayAbout a year and a half ago I wrote a post about job boards… I’ve been a little back and a little forth on them over the years. In my experience they were largely a waste of time. HOWEVER, they are not to be thrown out completely.

What I talked about back in January of 2018 still applies… these are TOOLS. Work them,  but don’t let them own you.

Read the whole thing here: New Thoughts on Job Boards for 2018

Leave a Comment »

Comment

Speaking of Soft Skills (Favorite Friday)

February 22nd, 2019

I came upon this post this week, where I talk about a forbes article that quoted me with 2 of the “7 most universal soft skills.” I mentioned creativity and curiousity, of course. the other five were interesting.

What really got my attention, though, was what people put in the comments. There are some very smart and observant people talking about soft skills they think are critical.

Check it out her: Universal Job Skills.

Comments Off on Speaking of Soft Skills (Favorite Friday)

Comment

How To Prepare for a Layoff Before it Happens

January 18th, 2019

In 2009 I wrote this post: Prepare For A Layoff Before It Happens. I think this was another great post (I was such a good blogger in those early days of JibberJobber!). Here are my points:

  1. Get your resume in order.
  2. Start getting your network in order.
  3. Start NETWORKING. (with three networking tips to do right now)
  4. Understand your finances.

I was pleasantly surprised to see some of my friends share their ideas… five from Twitter and six from Facebook… and of course, excellent comments.

Hey, happy new year! I’m not here to put a damper on things but if you aren’t planning for a layoff this year, you might get caught in a very sad and serious situation! Better to plan now than to be surprised later! Read how to prepare for a layoff before it happens here.

Comments Off on How To Prepare for a Layoff Before it Happens

Comment

When Networking Doesn’t Work For You

January 4th, 2019

One of my favorite thought leaders in the career space was the late Mark Hovind, who unexpectedly passed away in 2012. Talking with Mark was almost intellectually overwhelming. I struggled just to keep up with his ideas. He has been missed in this space. First, because of the research and insight he did an provided in the career and job search space. Second, because he was a man of high integrity.

In 2008 I wrote a post about networking not working… and it’s definitely worth your time. I used some of Mark’s numbers on the effectiveness of networking, and then I had some ideas about what to do if  networking doesn’t seem to be working for you. My four main points are:

  • Most people do not have a real network.
  • Most people don’t know how to network.
  • Most people don’t follow up.
  • Most people think growing their network list is networking.

The comments are also very insightful.

Go spend a few minutes on that post, and get results out of your networking efforts!

Comments Off on When Networking Doesn’t Work For You

Comment

When Job Search Advice Doesn’t Work For You

December 28th, 2018

In March 2018 I wrote this post about a JibberJobber user who was having problems with their job search. She had a great question… my advice is in the bottom half of the blog post and can be summarized in these three points:

  1. Think critically about the advice you get, and figure out how and what to apply to your situation
  2. Don’t go it alone
  3. Do something else, which can help with networking and create opportunities for other income streams

Go read the original post.

I am reminded of a time I was in San Francisco at an outplacement company speaking to their candidates. During my presentation a guy yelled out from the back “I’ve already done all that stuff, and it doesn’t work!”

Go back to my three points above. Each of them are equally important, but your implementation might look different than someone else’s.

Good luck!

Comments Off on When Job Search Advice Doesn’t Work For You

Comment

Stop Hiding and Start Your Job Search

December 21st, 2018

I talk to a lot of job seekers. I talk to a lot of coaches. Over the years I’ve had coaches say “if I tell my clients about JibberJobber they might waste their time on it, like they do on Facebook and LinkedIn!” I help them understand that JibberJobber isn’t a social network, so you won’t get lost looking at cat memes.

But their point was made, loud and clear. Coaches are concerned that job seekers are wasting their time.

That is because they are.

It is easier to do Thing A than Thing B, even though Thing A is meaningless. Example:

It’s easier to clean or organize your email than it is to email someone on your “chicken list.”

It’s easier to do some honey-do tasks than it is to go to a networking meeting.

It’s easier to revise your resume again than it is to get or go to an informational interview.

The things on the left are low-return, the things on the right are high-return. The things on the left are more comfortable, and easier to do.

They are also what I call hiding.

Check out this post I wrote in 2012 called Stop hiding and actually start your job search.

Comments Off on Stop Hiding and Start Your Job Search

Comment

Your Spouse’s Role in Your Job Search

November 30th, 2018

In 2010 I was inspired to write this post:

The Spouse’s Role in Your Job Search

I wrote this about 4 years after I got laid off because I had, by that time, worked with many job seekers, and was realizing that my personal experience with my job search and my wife was par for the course for almost everyone I talked to. That is, it is a very lonely experience, and we just didn’t know how to communicate during my job search.

We got to a point where we would communicate good news with one another, but the problem was that there wasn’t “good news.” I was running into brick wall after brick wall, with no real success. With all of these failures, with the lack of good news, I found that we weren’t communicating at all.

Not good for a relationship.

I wrote this post with 13 points and I am hopeful that it helps you recalibrate with your spouse during this exceptionally difficult period. I want you to take any of my points, and any others that you come up with, and then sit down with your spouse and have a real, open conversation.

The job search is not a time for a relationship to pause. I encourage you to keep the communication open and real, and realize that your job search is temporary, and hopefully your relationship will weather this hardship (and others) just fine.

Best wishes to you and your significant other as you navigate this very difficult period… together!

 

2 Comments »

Comment

Recruiters (and others) Smell the Blood of Job Seekers

November 16th, 2018

I had a fascinating conversation with a an HR friend of mine back in 2006, the year I lost my job and started JibberJobber. In this conversation he said “HR can smell blood from a mile away.”

It was as if the world stopped turning because he called me out, and I had a huge epiphany. You can read the original post here: I Smell Blood!

A year later I wrote Are You Bleeding? because by that time I had talked to a ton of job seekers and a common theme was that they were all proactively bleeding. The things they were saying, the way they were saying them, was bloody. It should an immense amount of hurt and grief.

I’m not one to take that away from you, for sure. I went through my own period(s) where I had hurt and grief. But I had to learn that spewing this hurt and grief was keeping me out of networking opportunities, and keeping my friends and contacts from referring me into the right people.

You don’t recommend someone who has fresh wounds that are impacting their thinking into an important networking opportunity. It was like these people were bleeding, and not realizing they were stalling their job search.

It was a hard realization for me, but a super important one. I hoe these two posts help you.

See Comments / Leave a Comment »

Comment

Sanity in a Job Loss

November 9th, 2018

I recently wrote the post Job Loss Grief Stages. While doing so I was looking for old posts I had written about this topic and found this post from 2012:

Dumb Little Man: How to Keep Your Sanity After Losing Your Job

Dumb Little Man, btw, is a blog with “tips for life.” Anyway, in this post the author (Lesley Knowles) shares six IMPORTANT points to keep your sanity while you are also going through the mourning/loss stages.

Depression in the job search is real. In fact, a post by me (a guy) on depression in the job search is my most popular post, with over 500 comments. My issue was that I was used to being very logical and linear, and depression was clouding my thinking. Check it out here: Depression Clouds Everything.

Comments Off on Sanity in a Job Loss

« Previous Entries