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The Confident Job Seeker

October 9th, 2020

In 2008 I wrote my first book on LinkedIn. Within a year or two I was in Minneapolis speaking at a few job clubs. Minneapolis (the Twin Cities area, really) holds a special place in my heart. I have spoken there probably 25 times over a few trips and have been welcomed so warmly. Of course, it’s Minnesota, right?

JibberJobber Minneapolis

So I go to Minneapolis for my first speaking tour and I was, well, of course, awesome. I had spoken in Texas and California and Washington and the D.C. area and Florida and other places, and going to Minneapolis for a few keynotes was pretty easy. I had polished my presentations, my stories, my timing… I was good.

Fast forward three years and I find myself in Minneapolis again. I’m reminded of the awesome people in the area who give so much to people in transition. Very good people with big hearts. They welcome me back and I make a similar tour like I did a few years prior. But this time something funny happened. A lady came up to me after one of my presentations and enthusiastically said,

“Jason, I went to your presentations a few years ago when you were in town. You were MUCH BETTER this time than a few years ago. You were good then, but you were just much better today!”

I was… um… flattered? Actually, I was a little speechless. I didn’t know what to think. Instead of appreciating the sincere compliment I was stuck on “geesh, was I really that bad three years ago?”

JibberJobber Confidence Job Seeker

It’s been years, almost a decade, since she told me that. I regularly think about it. I figured out years ago why she said it, and why it was true. It had everything to do with my confidence.

My presentation was mostly the same. While I had tried to freshen it up, I found it so principle-based that it was hard to change. And it was a great presentation. So it wasn’t better content… it was my confidence.

In those three years I had found my entrepreneurial sea legs. I wasn’t in “can I pay my bills this month” or “do we have enough grocery money this week” mode. I had figured some things out and was seeing enough success to finances, while still tight, didn’t feel suffocating.

I’m sure in the latter presentations I was in Minneapolis having a lot more fun, and enjoying the conversations I was having with people, than worrying about whether I would be good enough to convince someone to sign up on JibberJobber, or sell any of my stuff.

My presentation was noticeably better. And this is the message I want to share with you.

The year I started JibberJobber I wrote an important post titled I Smell Blood! That has the same message as my post today.  Please read that post when you are done with that one.

As a job seeker I know how scary things are. I know how you feel like you are off the cliff, hanging on by your fingernails. Hopeless, not knowing what the next few minutes or days will bring… it’s overwhelming.

I also know that you will be okay. It may take a few years to feel like you are on track again. It might take decades before you don’t fear another long-term bout of unemployment. But you will be okay. You are resilient. You are stronger and more empowered than you think. Want proof? Look at your career. What have you accomplished? I’m sure you’ve done remarkable things. Don’t let the circumstances of today define who you are. If you do, you are being influenced by lies. Let those wins from before today buoy you up and give you perspective into what you can accomplish.

JibberJobber Confident Job Seeker

Fake confidence. Fake it until you feel it. When others smell blood they won’t want to make introductions for you. When they smell blood they won’t pick you to work with them. Clean yourself up. I know this is hard. I know my advice might sound disingenuous. But it is important that you exude confidence, even if you are still trying to convince yourself that you are confident.

Need help? Reach out to me. When I became confident my job search changed. Later, when I had more confidence, my speaking changed. You need to make this change to see the results change.

I believe in you. Now, it’s your turn to believe in you.

JibberJobber Confidence Job Search

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Depression Sucks: Darkness in the Job Search (Tips From the Arctic)

November 18th, 2019

JibberJobber Depression Arctic Darkness

Depression clouds thinking. Depression can cloud everything. My most-commented on post was, I thought, a throw-away that no one would comment on.

But depression is too real, and the post connected with people. Check out the post, and the comments, here.

I live in a valley surrounded by mountains. Sounds charming, but there’s way too many people who live here to make it as charming as a Hallmark setting. Instead, and unfortunately, the mountain/valley arrangement gives us what they call an “inversion,” where we get air trapped over our valley for a while. When I say “air,” think dark, yucky pollution.

Winter here is an issue. It can be dark, gray, cold, unwelcoming, and then you have the inversion. Seasonal depression… that’s what they call it.

I think some people get career seasonal depression. I did, when I was in my job search (exhibit A). Many people I talk to are discouraged and depressed, anxious and on-edge. It just comes with the circumstances. I continue to look for anything to help myself and others who tend to go down that path, and was really quite interested in this article on Fast Company titled

I live in 24 hours of darkness each winter. Here’s how I stay sane

Please take the four minutes they say it will take to read this article. I think the entire article is fascinating.. Below the article are related links… explore those, too. I’ll list the five things the author lists to do, but please read the entire article for context. I don’t want you to brush over this list and think it’s a good idea… I want you to internalize the ideas.

Whether you live in the Arctic and won’t see the sun for a while or you live in sunny Florida and see the sun as much as you want, if you are in a job search you might be in your own darkness. These tips can be a part of your remedy.

  1. Keep a routine. Just make sure that what you have in your routine is actually working. Ditch the tactics that aren’t getting you anywhere.
  2. Plan excuses to be social. Job clubs, anyone??
  3. Opt for a technical solution. I might suggest, for job seekers, turn this around and opt for a non-technical solution – that is, TALK TO (MORE) PEOPLE!!
  4. Find things to look forward to. This is why, in my Job Search Program, I talk about vision so much. You will land a job, you won’t be unemployed forever.
  5. Don’t fight the darkness. Recognize that the job search sucks, and accept it, but don’t accept defeat. Know your enemy, as Sun Tzu would say.

Here’s the article:

Fast Company Depression

 

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What To Do If You Hate Your Job

June 18th, 2019

jibberjobber-start-with-the-way-job-satisfactionI was chatting with Liz this morning about Project HOPE, which is now in alpha testing. I asked her if she wanted to listen to my audio, and see the feedback from the testers, and she said YES. She then wrote something interesting/funny:

“I worked at JibberJobber for several years without reading your blog. When I started to read it, I finally understood what we do.”

Now, this post is about hating your job. I daresay, Liz didn’t and doesn’t hate her job. But her comment made me chuckle.

In the early days of JibberJobber blogging was one of my highest priorities. It was my marketing. It was the way I got information out. I could easily spend 45 minutes a day writing a post. My mind was consumed with thoughts about job search and career management. I didn’t realize that my team wasn’t watching the little bit of work I was doing that was highly public.

Liz’s comment hit me today though. At Bamboo last year my awesome boss talked about the importance of WHY. Working towards employee satisfaction and employee engagement, we needed to help employees understand the WHY.

Most people know the WHAT and the HOW of their job. They come to work and do their thing. But how many people know the WHY of their work?

Do YOU know the WHY of your work?

If you hate your job, I invite you to do one of two things. The first is to figure out the WHY. It might be your WHY, which could be to provide for your family, or to get out of debt, or to afford the lifestyle you want, or to be around people who inspire you, or _______________. I don’t know what your WHYs are.

The next WHY to figure out is the company’s WHY. Is it to better the world, or help people, to make lives easier? Is it to be the best, and excel, and grow, and inspire others? What is it?

Pluralsight‘s WHY is to democratize technology education around the world.

JibberJobber‘s WHY is to empower individuals with tools and knowledge about career management, and especially help people during a very tough part of their life (unemployment).

I recognize that many organizations’ WHY is to make gobs of money. I bet, though, if you go back to the founder’s vision, or some visionary leader who is there today, you’ll hear a different WHY.

Like Liz said, it wasn’t until she read my blog, years after she started working with JibberJobber, that she understood “what we do.” Or, what drives me. Or WHY we are even around. I imagine that catching my WHY changed her WHY. And as long as my WHY was aligned with her values, her level of integrity, and her personal goals, she got more fulfillment being a part of my WHY. This translates to employee satisfaction. And increased employee satisfaction leads to increased employee engagement.

Employee satisfaction and employee engagement are the holy grails of HR (just look at agendas at their conferences: how do we make our employees happy? How do we get them more engaged (aka, do their work)?)

I’m not here to talk about how HR can do better, and get more out of you. I’m here to talk about how YOU can get more personal fulfillment in your life and career.

I think the first most important thing is to understand the greater WHY.

If that doesn’t work… if you hear and understand the why and you still hate your job, then my second piece of advice is to quit. Go somewhere else.

Look, if you hate it, and you don’t care for their WHY, then you aren’t going to hate it less. You might even resent it more. Don’t torture yourself by staying in a crappy situation. Find, or make, the situation you don’t dread.

Life is too short to give months and years to a mismatch, especially when it can harm your mental, emotional, spiritual, and physical health. If this is you, find the WHY, and if that doesn’t change things, move on.

jibbejrobber-hate-job

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Losing Your Job Feels Like a Barn Fire Destroyed Everything

December 14th, 2018

Granted, I’ve never owned a barn. Nor have I ever harvested hay. So I’m not sure what losing it all to a barn fire feels like. But I can imagine.

I posted this November 2nd:

jibberjobber_barn_fire_job_loss

I can imagine the work and investment it took to plant and cultivate 150 tons of hay. The hope and anticipation… what does 150 tons of hay mean for your family? For your future? The work of harvesting the hay and stacking it neatly in the barn. A job that could be dangerous and take more hours than I can imagine.

The work. The investment. The hope. The vision. The chance to make a difference.

All of it goes up because of a barn fire. How did it start? Could something like this ever be 100% prevented?

I read this article about a week after I got notice that “your last day with us is on November 30th.”

Every part of the vision I had for my job, my contribution to the company and to the customers, just got set on fire.

Of course, I had an idea this could be coming. But until the words fall from their lips, it’s just my nervous inclination to allow myself to think of the worst. I had been unsettled for a couple of months since my boss, the VP who hired me, had left. Then, the executives questioned the validity of the program… which meant that my future at the company was likely on the line. They said that even if the program were terminated, they’d find a place for me in the company. I heard that from people who had been at the company for years. “We just don’t lay people off.” “Layoff is not in our vocabulary.”

I was told that they hadn’t laid anyone off for four years. And here I was, the lucky guy who got to be “once every four years.”

I was and am upset for a host of reasons. But back to the barn fire… I put a lot of work into my job. Since February, I caught my boss’s vision, and we worked hard all the way until he left to move towards the vision.

And then, the fire came and burned it all down.

Yes, money was lost.

Yes, investment was lost.

But what really hurt was when my vision was burned. I wasn’t going to be able to change the world, in that way, with that opportunity, anymore.

And that was one of the most painful parts of this layoff.

 

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Self-Doubt in the Job Search

December 12th, 2018

I’ll let you in on a little secret. Maybe a few secrets.

I’ve owned my own business for almost thirteen years now. I’m what they call an entrepreneur. I’m living the dream.

I get to work when I want and do what I want. No, I’m not financially independent… but for many years I have not commuted and worked in an office, I haven’t had to ask for vacation leave, I have been able to stop working with people I didn’t like, and I could choose to focus on the part of my business that made the most sense at the time.

The dream.

Over the years, as I’ve toyed with the idea of having a “real job” and becoming a “productive member of society” and having all of the stableness and “security” the salary and benefits that an employer offers, I’ve had one major problem:

I didn’t know what I had to offer.

I didn’t know what skills or abilities I could bring to the table.

I didn’t even know where to start. I called a friend who is a recruiter and said “Rob, I have no idea what position I would even be suited for. Help me figure this out.”

Without hesitating he said I am clearly a product manager.  Oooooh, I like that. Product manager. It is what I’ve done for about twenty years now. I do indeed love all things product management.

So I made a product manager resume and put it out.

I’m sure of what I’ve done, and what I can do, but when I put my resume out I found that hiring managers in software companies don’t care one bit about entrepreneurs who do product management. We are square pegs, they are round holes. They look at us with pity, maybe disgust, wondering what we could possibly add to their team.

Maybe they are afraid of the entrepreneurial attitude. Maybe we are too out-of-the-box thinking for them. Maybe we are better suited for their job than for a lowly product manager role.

I’m not sure why, but the discrimination I’ve felt as a do-it-yourself, self-taught product manager was tangible.

In one interview the guy said “tell me something. Every product manager here wants to start their own side hustle, and leave their position. You have a side hustle, why would you want to come here as a product manager?” It wasn’t a regular interview question…. he was sincerely asking why in the world I would want to stop living the dream and go into corporate America. It seemed backwards to him.

Another, a VP of product, just couldn’t get past the idea that I owned JibberJobber. He was sure that I would not do my the job, but would do JibberJobber all day long while on his dime. I assured him that no, I would do the job and keep JibberJobber to my own personal time, but he just didn’t buy it. I’m not sure why.

I didn’t really know what I had to offer in the first place. And then, when I got these kinds of reactions in interviews I really wondered if I could actually do anything professionally.

I have written three books. I’ve authored 30 Pluralsight courses. I’ve created and maintained JibberJobber, which is really quite amazing. I have spoken across the U.S. and in Europe. I have an MBA and a CIS degree. I speak Spanish and English. I used to program and have lost any current skills, but I can do html-ish stuff fine. I have been general manager and sat on a (hostile) board of directors.

There’s more of course, but looking back on any of these things, how could I possibly have any doubt that I could do this job, or that job, or another job? Any of those things can be broken down into a set of skills and talents… I’m not lacking skills or talents.

But I doubt. I have thought for many years that I am unhireable. Maybe it’s because what seems to be hired is the younger, less experienced professional. “1 to 3 years experience… others need not apply.”

Am I good for anything?

In January of this year my new boss reached out his hand and brought me into a “best companies to work for” company. It was amazing. He saw me. He say my value. He valued it. And he taught me to see my value and value it.

I think that human nature is not understanding who we are and how great we are (or can be). It’s easier to see that in others, but hard to see in ourselves. Especially when the job search goes on. Especially when you get rejection after rejection. Or you continually get a third interview, but they pass on you and go with the other person. How many times can you play second chair and not get a complex about yourself?

Self-doubt is no fun. It is not productive. It puts you in a place that is not good for your networking or interviewing or just getting out of bed and continuing to fight the fight.

I don’t know how to solve your self-doubt issues. For me, I had to do stuff. I had to write another book, author another course, build more stuff in JibberJobber, get another speaking gig. I had to rack up virtual points to validate myself. Not because I needed the ego stroke, but because I needed to chip away the self-talk (and the silence in the job search, which was almost as bad), and prove that YES, I could do things. YES, I did have value. YES, I should be on your team.

It’s a hard battle, but figure out what you can do to win the battle. The alternative is that you find a way to cope, that you sink into depression, and that you go down a path that could be hard to recover from. Figuring this battle out is a life skill. It is what millennial call “adulting.”

Fight this battle because you deserve it for you. And your loved ones deserve a you that isn’t losing this battle.

I know you have value. I know you can do stuff.

Now, prove it to yourself!

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Recruiters (and others) Smell the Blood of Job Seekers

November 16th, 2018

I had a fascinating conversation with a an HR friend of mine back in 2006, the year I lost my job and started JibberJobber. In this conversation he said “HR can smell blood from a mile away.”

It was as if the world stopped turning because he called me out, and I had a huge epiphany. You can read the original post here: I Smell Blood!

A year later I wrote Are You Bleeding? because by that time I had talked to a ton of job seekers and a common theme was that they were all proactively bleeding. The things they were saying, the way they were saying them, was bloody. It should an immense amount of hurt and grief.

I’m not one to take that away from you, for sure. I went through my own period(s) where I had hurt and grief. But I had to learn that spewing this hurt and grief was keeping me out of networking opportunities, and keeping my friends and contacts from referring me into the right people.

You don’t recommend someone who has fresh wounds that are impacting their thinking into an important networking opportunity. It was like these people were bleeding, and not realizing they were stalling their job search.

It was a hard realization for me, but a super important one. I hoe these two posts help you.

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The Power of Job Clubs and Job Ministries

May 6th, 2016

JibberJobber Job Clubs

This week I shared this with my two LinkedIn Groups (Job Search Career Network and the JibberJobber Career Management Group):

When I go back to the church where I went to my weekly job club (aka career ministry), ten years ago, my knees still get weak. I get nervous about sharing my 30 second pitch, and “networking.” You see, I’m an introvert, and walking into a room full of job seekers is not my idea of a “good time.”

But this job club was perhaps one of the most important things I had done as a job seeker. I went from doing this job search thing alone, in my house, to talking to others and really figuring out what I could do better, and as important, realizing that I wasn’t alone in this seemingly horrible journey. I got support and training, and I’ve been an advocate of job clubs ever since.

Humbling myself, going regularly, and even participating, defined the pivotal point in my job search. Even though I chose to start JibberJobber, instead of pursue a job, the time I spent with others, serving and getting served, brought me out of my depression and hopelessness.

My question to you is this: what job clubs are in your area that you go to, or would recommend? Let’s get a list of these resources, participate where we can, and encourage others to go. Leave a comment or email me and let me know about job clubs local to you.

Here’s a blog post I wrote about this back in 2008:http://www.jibberjobber.com/blog/2008/07/09/get-value-out-of-job-ministries-even-when-you-arent-religous/ Check out the comments, which as usual, are more valuable than the post.

In those posts, the groups people talked about include:

  • Sacrament, CA: Bayside’s Career Coaching
  • D.C. area: McLean Bible Church (I’ve spoken there multiple times)
  • San Diego area: NC3 Career Transitions
  • Madison, AL: St. Joseph the Worker Job Networking Club
  • Hoffman Estates, IL: St. Hubert Catholic Church

What are job clubs or ministries that you recommend, or know about?

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Ten Ways To Feel Less Poor #jobsearch

April 21st, 2016

“You are getting laid off.”

One of the first thoughts that comes to mind is: “Um, I live paycheck-to-paycheck! I only have enough money for the next 10 days!”

I’ve been happily employed, unhappily employed, unemployed, and an entrepreneur.  At various times, in all of those different phases, I have felt poor.  I’ve been thinking about this post for months, and I have finally resolved to just write this post, even though I’m going to miss something. So that’s what the comments section is for!

Here are ten things I’ve done to feel less poor.  If you have anything to add, please leave a comment.

  1. I buy razors from Costco. I get a package of 52 for around $35.  Maybe $45, I can’t remember. They aren’t cool, robotic, electric, swivel-headed, but they do have 3 blades on each disposable razor. I used to have the cool ones, with replacement cartridges, but those were more expensive than this find. I shave maybe twice a week, which isn’t much, so this box lasts me forever.  I get the right tool for the job, without feeling like I’m spending luxury prices.
  2. Buy a new (shirt, jeans, socks, etc.). It’s amazing how high quality, great fit clothing can make you feel “like a million bucks.” I’m not saying to swap out your entire wardrobe, but if you feel poor, and then dress in either really cheap clothes that don’t last long, or your old clothes that used to look good but are now faded, sagging, etc., you’ll only extend how you feel by how you look.  For me, just getting nice, new socks, make a difference on how I feel. Instead of “I’m not worth it,” switch that around, and move on from feeling like all you deserve is stuff you really don’t want to be seen in public in.
  3. Fix that dumb thing that has been bugging you. Sometimes there’s a thing that is bugging us 24×7… perhaps it’s a chipped faceplate for a light switch (the fix is less than a dollar), or a wall that just needs to be repainted (for less than $30), or maybe even just washed!  Instead of mentally moping about how you’ll do it when you can afford it, do it now, and treat yourself with respect.
  4. Re-evaluate expenses. I love walking in a store past the satellite TV company sales reps. They say “what do you do for TV?” When I respond that we don’t have TV, they don’t know what to say. Speechless.  Don’t get me wrong, we watch plenty of shows, but we don’t subscribe to a monthly, other than our internet connection. Look at all of your monthly committments, and question which ones you really need. You might be surprised that you are spending $20/monthly here, or $80/monthly there, and not getting any value out of it.  That can add up to hundreds and hundreds of dollars of money that could go towards your needs.
  5. Buy (and eat) healthier food. When I eat unhealthy, I feel it. Maybe it’s because I’m in my 40’s. Maybe it’s because my body is malnourished. Contrast that to days I eat really healthy. Feel great, more energy, etc.  Instead of sitting around like a slug, feeling full and bloated and low-energy, I am anxious to get up and get out and work and/or enjoy. Sitting around gives you more time to think about all the stuff you don’t have, where getting out helps you slow down and enjoy the here and now. Is healthier more expensive?  Kind of.  But if you feel like it’s too expensive, than start a garden… even if it’s just in your living room.
  6. Change your idea of “fun” from expense-based to free (hiking, people watching, bird watching, etc.). What is your perfect idea of having fun?  It probably includes spending money on a trip, a ticket, a meal. Those have been rewards… what if we change our idea of fun to be more of an experience that we can have without spending money? When I took my family on a trip last summer, the most amazing, fun places we stayed were campgrounds, not hotels with pools. The campgrounds allowed us to connect with nature and the community we were in. We socialized with others, and there’s one family we still have a relationship with.
  7. Stop pouring over the news and social media. This is a great place to compare your life and abilities with others… and many times it’s harmful. I love seeing what others are doing, and celebrating their accomplishments, but it’s easy to compare your seemingly dull everyday life with what they post, which is usually the highlights of their life. Why not go make your own highlights, away from the great comparison machine?
  8. Focus on paying down your debt and punching interest in the nose. Feel poor? Maybe you are. But you don’t have to be that way forever. I love listening to the success stories of people who call into Dave Ramsey’s show. They are laser focused on addressing the problem head-on, and determined to change their life.  Stop ignoring your financial issues. Learn about them, figure out a plan, and work your plan.
  9. Pick up a revenue stream that empowers your earning potential. When I was writing 51 Alternatives to a New Job I decided to try something I had never done before.  Long story short, I went out with my kids and we made about $40/hour painting house numbers on curbs. I had no idea that you could make that much money doing that. There are easily dozens and dozens of things like that you could do. Pick up dog poop in a neighbor’s yard…. not anything to brag about, for sure, but it could give you an extra $20. You don’t make that money sitting around watching shows.
  10. Be genuinely happy for others’ financial success, vacations, new purchases, upgrades, etc. I think it’s human nature to look at someone else’s fortunes and only be jealous because of the state of our misfortunes. Whether they earned it, inherited it, or even deserve it is not our concern. It’s not within our control. But how we react is. Can you celebrate their new house, or upgrade, or new shoes, or new job, or great haircut?  If you can’t celebrate theirs, what makes you think you are going to enjoy yours, when it comes? Practice appreciation by appreciating, and when you get gain, you will appreciate your own stuff more.

Probably everyone on my blog feels financially poor to some degree or another. This list is my attempt to share some ideas and tactics on how to minimize those feelings.  What are YOUR suggestions?

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Need Encouragement? FREE ​Encouragement Matters Telesummit

October 6th, 2015

denny_stockdale_headshotI met Denny Stockdale a few years ago, while speaking in the Minneapolis area. Denny is a great guy, and has been a passionate supporter of JibberJobber, and JibberJobber users, for years.

Denny is the organizer of the Enouragement Matters Telesummit, which is FREE, over 12 days, with 12 sessions.  Go to this page and register (at the bottom).  Denny wants you to attend the sessions if you say yes to any of these:

  • Have you ever pursued a big dream that didn’t come true?
  • Have you ever been afraid of failure?
  • Have you ever let the past interfere with the present?
  • Have you ever had “negative” self-talk?
  • Have you ever felt under-appreciated?

 I want you to sign up for this free event if you are (a) a job seeker, and/or (b) a (wanna-be) entrepreneur.

Denny is awesome, and his guests seem like they are really cool.  Here’s what the agenda looks like (more details here… also, these are all at 8pm EST except the two on Saturdays, which are at noon EST)

Monday, October 12: Dr. Dale Anderson: The Chemistry of Happiness: Curtain UP!

Tuesday, October 13: Barry Shore: Reframing the ART of LIVING

Wednesday, October 14: Lisa Bloom, The Story Coach : Your story is your success

Thursday, October 15: Dr. Suzanne Lerner : Transforming Your Inner Critic Into Your Inner Ally

Friday, October 16: Yvonne Silver : Stop “burning out” and start living – the power of your words

Saturday: October 17: Pete Evans : The Go-Giver Attitude to create a Kinder world

Monday, October 19: Kim Clausen : Be HAPPY: Humor And Purpose Power You!

Tuesday, October 20: Caroline Ceniza-Levine and Renita Kalhorn: Encouragement and Resilience: The Secret To Achieving Success In Business and Life

Wednesday, October 21: Elizabeth Craig : 3 Key Tips: Encouragement in Leadership and Successful Career Transitions

Thursday, October 22: Andy Spyros : Creating the Energy of Success

Friday, October 23: Catherine Byers Breet: Falling down (and other great ways to achieve your dreams)

Saturday, October 24: Denny Stockdale : The power of Encouragement, Faith, and Curiosity

Looks pretty awesome, right?  Sign up for the free event, and then attend as many as you can.  I imagine we can all use some encouragement!

NOTE: Denny emailed me and let me know that the event is free, and he will offer the recordings for a nominal price.  If you can’t make it to the live recordings, that is a great option. I won’t be able to give anyone the recordings… you can get those through Denny :)

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Volunteer your way to your next job

July 1st, 2014

According to a LinkedIn article I recently read, people who volunteer are 27% more likely to get a job than people who don’t.  That’s a pretty big difference.

My volunteer experience didn’t work out as well as I would have liked… but if I had to do it over, I would definitely look for more volunteer opportunities.

Aside from increasing your likelihood of getting a job (because of the networking you are doing), volunteering gets you out of the house, and doing something productive.  This has to be a good way to keep your attitude in check.

Are you volunteering?  If not, why not??

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